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Corbyn: Labour's Brexit position not confusing
Corbyn: Labour's Brexit position not confusing

The Labour leader says he accepts the UK will leave the EU but he will not allow the country to "go off a cliff in March 2019".

Jeremy Corbyn has denied that Labour's position on Brexit is "confusing" as he ruled out support for a second referendum.

The Labour leader said his party accepted the UK was formally leaving the European Union but it would not allow the country to "go off a cliff in March 2019".

"Our position is that we are not advocating a second referendum," Mr Corbyn told the i newspaper.

"We have had a referendum which came to a decision. The negotiations are still ongoing, albeit well behind schedule, and we've set out the kind of relationship we want to have with Europe in the future."

On Labour's Brexit stance, Mr Corbyn said: "I don't think it's confusing.

"We are formally leaving the European Union of course - that is the position - (but we want to) develop a good economic relationship with Europe and recognise the interdependence of our industries."

The same unsuccessful amendment was opposed by two Labour MPs.

A group of 70 London-based Labour councillors also reportedly wrote a letter asking shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer to commit to provide the opportunity for "people to change their mind".

Lib Dem Brexit spokesman Tom Brake said Mr Corbyn's latest remarks showed Labour was "nailing (its) colours to the mast in support of hard Brexit".

"The party of opposition has again shirked their responsibility to oppose Theresa May's Government," he said.

Meanwhile, Mr Corbyn said he believes he can maintain momentum behind his party even if there is no general election until 2022.

"I've got loads of energy," he told the Independent.

"I'm fine. I eat porridge every morning. Porridge and energy bars and I keep off alcohol and meat."

December 29, 2017

 Beyonce and Jay-Z seem to confess all in video teaser for 'Family Feud'
Beyonce and Jay-Z seem to confess all in video teaser for 'Family Feud'

Jay-Z and Beyoncé seem to be opening up even more about their past marital issues in the rapper's new video for "Family Feud."

A preview of the video for the track reveals the superstar rapper confessing his sins in church, scenes of infidelity, a cameo from the couple's daughter, Blue Ivy, and the singer herself behind a church altar, wearing a flowing gown and headdress.

The song, which comes from Jay-Z's "4:44" album, features vocals by Beyoncé, who co-wrote the track as well. Lyrics seem to allude to infidelity, with the rapper stating: "Yeah, I'll f--- up a good thing if you let me/Let me alone, Becky" -- a reference to Beyoncé's song, "Sorry."

Jay-Z, 48, and Beyoncé, 36, wed in 2008 and have three children: Blue, 5, and twins Rumi and Sir, who were born earlier this year. Last month, the rapper told The New York Times that many marriages may not have survived the problems they've faced, including his infidelity.

"You know, most people walk away, and the divorce rate is like 50 percent or something 'cause most people can’t see themselves," he said. "The hardest thing is seeing pain on someone’s face that you caused, and then have to deal with yourself.

"And, you know, at the end of the day we really have a healthy respect for one another's craft," he added. "I think she's amazing."

December 29, 2017

 'Dick Van Dyke Show' actress Rose Marie has died
'Dick Van Dyke Show' actress Rose Marie has died

“I think everybody decided I was the first women’s libber because of that show. I’ve had many girls tell me, ‘Because of you, I became a writer. You gave me the inspiration,’” she said. “And I’m very proud of that.”

Rose Marie, who was married to musician Bobby Guy until his death in 1964, is survived by their daughter, Georgiana Marie, and son-in-law, Steven Rodrigues.

December 29, 2017

 Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson and Gal Gadot are Forbes' top-grossing actors of 2017
Vin Diesel, Dwayne Johnson and Gal Gadot are Forbes' top-grossing actors of 2017

Diesel topped the list, with his movies pulling in $1.6 billion in global ticket sales, mostly on the strength of "The Fate of the Furious" -- the eighth film in the "Fast and Furious" franchise. That film became the second-highest grossing film in the series. The 50-year-old action star also got some help from his other 2017 flick, "xXx: The Return of Xander Cage."

Diesel edged out Johnson -- his "Fate of the Furious" co-star -- whose appearance in the box office flop "Baywatch" didn't hold his movies back from raking in $1.5 billion. His latest film, "Jumanji," released a week ago, will only add to that number.

Gadot's turn as Wonder Woman, the titular character in the Patty Jenkins-directed film, earned $822 million globally, on its way to becoming the highest-grossing live-action movie ever directed by a woman. Boosted by her appearance in "Justice League," the Israeli actress accounted for a total of $1.4 billion at the box office.

The list also includes a couple of the stars of Lucasfilm's "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" -- Daisy Ridley came in at number six with $1.08 billion and John Boyega locked down the No. 10 spot with $815 million. Boyega also appeared in films including "Detroit" and "The Circle." Meanwhile, Ridley joined an all-star cast for a remake of Agatha Christie's "Murder on the Orient Express."

Forbes used 2017 global ticket sales of major actors’ films, in which they had top billing, as reported by Box Office Mojo. Animated films were excluded.

December 29, 2017

 Terry Crews gets into fiery debate about race and sexual misconduct
Terry Crews gets into fiery debate about race and sexual misconduct

Terry Crews recently got into a social media debate about how men should react in the face of sexual misconduct, and how race factors in.

One person started the debate when he appeared to question the actor's masculinity earlier this week by tweeting, “Some men actually defend themselves,” tagging an article about actor Jason Priestley recalling punching Harvey Weinstein at a party.

Weinstein, who is accused of sexual misconduct by multiple women, has acknowledged inappropriate behavior, but has denied any allegations of nonconsensual sex or retaliation against women for refusing his advances.

After a slew of Twitter users slammed the person in question, Crews also replied, “White people in America can do a lot of things I’d be arrested for.”

This started a back-and-forth debate in the thread and on Crews' social media page lasting almost two days into late Wednesday night.

Regarding the suggestion that Crews should have physically defended himself from his alleged assaulter, agent Adam Venit -- whom he is now suing for sexual battery, emotional distress and negligence, among others -- one person replied, “There is factual evidence that black people are given harsher sentences than white people for the same crimes committed. Public perception of black people is very negative, and if Terry had reacted with violence, it would've just reinforced the stereotypes about us."

Some people brought up Crews' wealth being more important than race, while another person commented, "I think you're a great guy and very talented ... please don't fall into the anti-white cesspool ... you're better then [sic] that!"

As the comments became heated, Crews admitted that he is privileged, writing, "No one should feel shamed for being privileged. I’M PRIVILEGED. But people confuse privilege with VALUE. No one is more valuable than anyone else." But he didn't back down.

No one should feel shamed for being privileged. I’M PRIVILEGED. But people confuse privilege with VALUE.

Fans continued to support Crews by telling him to never back down from online trolls that try to bait him into this type of argument.

"My first attorney told me I should sue for charity because of the 'perception.' I let him know white men sue for money all the time. Then I fired him," he wrote.

Why, when white men sue, they’re called shrewd and savvy businessmen—

But when women and POC do the same thing, they’re called opportunists?

Crews named his alleged accuser as Venit last month on "Good Morning America" and claimed the agent groped him last year at a party. He then filed a suit against Venit and his employer, William Morris Endeavor, earlier this month. Venit was suspended by WME earlier this year.

December 29, 2017

 Obama warns of social media use in new interview with Prince Harry
Obama warns of social media use in new interview with Prince Harry

The two discussed social media, with Obama warning that caution is necessary.

The former president also said people in a position of power should exercise care when posting messages and said he is concerned that social media is “corroding civil discourse."

“All of us in leadership have to find ways in which we can recreate a common space on the Internet," Obama said. "One of the dangers of the Internet is that people can have entirely different realities. They can be cocooned in information that reinforces their current biases."

The wide-ranging interview on a multitude of topics was conducted in September at Harry's Invictus Games but was not released until today, when Harry served as the guest editor of the BBC’s flagship morning program.

Prince Harry explained: “If you really want to make change you need to look up from your phone, you need to get out into your communities and you need to stand up for what you believe in."

Obama reflected on his last days in office and his emotions when he left the presidency. He shared that despite feeling satisfied it was “mixed with all the work that was still undone.”

“Concerns about how the country moves forward but, you know, overall there was serenity there," he added.

Harry focused his show on themes that were central to his charitable work: Empowering youth, providing resources, education and training for service members who have departed the military, and mental health awareness.

Those are all issues the former president and first lady supported during their eight-year tenure at the White House.

"The things that are important to me haven't changed," Obama told Harry. "I still care about making the United States and the world a place where kids get an education, where people who are willing to work hard are able to find a job that pays a living wage, that we are conserving the amazing resources of our planet so that future generations can enjoy the beauty of this place like we did."

Harry was asked on BBC’s Radio 4 about having the tables turned and being the interviewer.

"I haven't done that many interviews but it was quite fun," he said. "Especially interviewing President Obama, despite the fact he wanted to interview me.”

Harry also conceded that the process was still a bit nerve-wracking. “You're excited about this, I'm nervous about this, that's what's quite funny," Harry said. Obama replied, "I'll interview you if you want."

The fifth-in-line to the throne shared that it was much harder than it looked even though he has done hundreds of interviews in his life.

"It's been a big learning curve but also these are incredibly important topics we all need to think about and need to be discussed," he said.

Missed the programme guest edited by Prince Harry?

Prince Charles told his son, "What I’ve been trying to do all these years is to make sure that, if I can possibly and I’m not sure if I can, is to ensure that you and your children, my grandchildren, also everyone else’s grandchildren, have a world fit to live in that provides them with opportunity."

Harry replied to his dad that he feels "optimistic about the future."

"Coming from a younger generation it is incredibly exciting and I feel optimistic about the future because now is a real test for, a real test for humanity to be able to swing that pendulum and say right in order for us to make our mark on this planet," Harry said.

Prince Charles thanked his son, saying, “Well darling boy it makes me very proud to think that you understand."

December 29, 2017

 Ridiculed former Miss America calls board offer 'laughable'
Ridiculed former Miss America calls board offer 'laughable'

Mallory Hagan told The Associated Press on Thursday that the offer made Wednesday night by the remaining members of the group's board is insulting to anyone who ever competed or volunteered in the pageant.

She and other former Miss Americas are renewing their call for the entire board to step down. The CEO, president and board chairman resigned Saturday.

"The statement from the remaining Miss America Board of Directors is an insult to every Miss America and volunteer's intelligence," she said. "Implying that the complicit members of the current board will now choose the new leadership for the forward movement of the Miss America Organization is laughable.

"I will not stop until Miss America is led by the people who embody the morals and values that the organization holds dear," Hagan said. "Whether they knew about these emails or not only confirms their inability to effectively lead this multi-million dollar nonprofit. If they truly care about the forward movement of the MAO, they should all step aside. Period."

Hagan started a petition Wednesday on change.org seeking the removal of all remaining Miss America board members that had garnered thousands of signatures within 24 hours.

The board said Wednesday it wants former Miss Americas and state directors to help in the search for new leadership, asking the groups to nominate four people to serve on a search committee that also will include two board members and a person the board members appoint.

That offer drew widespread opposition from former Miss Americas and state title winners as soon as word of it circulated.

The board was hoping for nominations for the search committee by Jan. 3, but it was not immediately clear what would happen if the former winners do not participate.

December 29, 2017

 Bono feels like 'luckiest man on Earth' after mysterious near death experience
Bono feels like 'luckiest man on Earth' after mysterious near death experience

However, Bono did say this much: "People have these extinction events in their lives; it could be psychological or it could be physical. And, yes, it was physical for me."

Asked whether he felt lucky to get past it, the rocker said, "I am the f------ luckiest man on Earth."

"I didn't think that I had a fear of a fast exit," Bono, 57, continued. "I thought it would be inconvenient 'cause I have a few albums to make and kids to see grow up and this beautiful woman and my friends and all of that. ... And then suddenly you are that guy. And you think, 'I don't want to leave here. There's so much more to do.' And I'm blessed."

U2 recently released their latest album, "Songs of Experience," and Bono said his brush with mortality affected the vibe of certain songs.

"Not surrendering to melancholy is the most important thing if you are going to fight your way out of whatever corner you are in," he said. "And I never wanted to surrender to that, so punk rock, the tempo of some songs, suddenly became really important."

The aforementioned health scare wasn't Bono's first brush with death. In 2014, he suffered multiple fractures in a bicycle accident in New York's Central Park.

December 29, 2017

 Beyonce and Jay-Z seem to confess all in video teaser for 'Family Feud'
Beyonce and Jay-Z seem to confess all in video teaser for 'Family Feud'

Jay-Z and Beyoncé seem to be opening up even more about their past marital issues in the rapper's new video for "Family Feud."

A preview of the video for the track reveals the superstar rapper confessing his sins in church, scenes of infidelity, a cameo from the couple's daughter, Blue Ivy, and the singer herself behind a church altar, wearing a flowing gown and headdress.

The song, which comes from Jay-Z's "4:44" album, features vocals by Beyoncé, who co-wrote the track as well. Lyrics seem to allude to infidelity, with the rapper stating: "Yeah, I'll f--- up a good thing if you let me/Let me alone, Becky" -- a reference to Beyoncé's song, "Sorry."

Jay-Z, 48, and Beyoncé, 36, wed in 2008 and have three children: Blue, 5, and twins Rumi and Sir, who were born earlier this year. Last month, the rapper told The New York Times that many marriages may not have survived the problems they've faced, including his infidelity.

"You know, most people walk away, and the divorce rate is like 50 percent or something 'cause most people can’t see themselves," he said. "The hardest thing is seeing pain on someone’s face that you caused, and then have to deal with yourself.

"And, you know, at the end of the day we really have a healthy respect for one another's craft," he added. "I think she's amazing."

December 29, 2017

 Actress Rose Marie of 'Dick Van Dyke Show' fame dies at 94
Actress Rose Marie of 'Dick Van Dyke Show' fame dies at 94

Marie had been resting in bed at her Los Angeles-area home when a caretaker found she had stopped breathing, said family spokesman Harlan Boll.

"Heaven just got a whole lot funnier" was the tribute posted atop a photo of Marie on her website.

She was a child star of the 1920s and 1930s who endeared herself to TV fans on the classic '60s sitcom that featured Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore.

The subject of the 2017 documentary "Wait for Your Laugh," Marie often claimed she had the longest career in entertainment history. It spanned some 90 years, with co-stars ranging from W.C. Fields to Garfield the cat, and the highlight for many was "The Dick Van Dyke Show."

The sitcom was widely loved for its sophisticated writing, inspired casting and insightful view of the inner workings of the then-new medium of television. Van Dyke starred as Rob Petrie, head writer for a hit comedy-variety show and Mary Tyler Moore, in her first major role, played his wife Laura.

The blonde, raspy-voiced Marie teamed with her pal Morey Amsterdam as assistant writers.

Drawing on his experiences on Sid Caesar's shows, Carl Reiner created the series, wrote and directed many episodes and made occasional appearances as the surly star, Alan Brady. After an uncertain beginning in 1961, "The Dick Van Dyke Show" caught on with TV viewers, was still popular when it ended in 1966 and remained a favorite for decades in reruns.

"There's never been a more engaging & multi-talented performer .... & always had audiences clamoring for "more!!" Reiner posted Thursday on Twitter.

"The Dick Van Dyke Show" not only was an ideal vehicle for Marie's comic gifts, but was a showcase for her singing, with Sally belting out "Come Rain or Come Shine" and other old favorites during nightclub and party scenes.

Marie was especially proud of playing a woman defined by her work, a rare sitcom character at the time who wasn't "a wife, mother, or housekeeper," she tweeted in 2017.

The actress did have conflicts with Reiner, resenting that Moore was given more prominence than her on the show. Reiner, speaking in "Wait for Your Laugh," bluntly pushed back. "I used real strong language," he recalled. "I said, 'You both have beautiful legs. They wanna look at her legs.'"

Nominated three times for Emmys, Rose Marie had yet to turn 40 when she joined the Van Dyke cast, but had been an entertainer for more than 30 years.

She was born Rose Marie Mazetta of Italian-Polish parentage in New York City on Aug. 15, 1923. When she was 3, her mother entered her in an amateur talent contest in Atlantic City as Baby Rose Marie.

"My mother was terrified," she recalled in a 1992 interview with The Associated Press. "But I went out and sang 'What Can I Say, Dear, After I Say I'm Sorry?' and won the contest."

She began singing on radio and was a hit on "The Rudy Vallee Hour." NBC gave her a seven-year contract and her own show, 15 minutes on Sunday. Her powerful voice gave rise to rumors.

"Stories went around that I was really a 45-year-old midget," she remarked in 1992. "So they sent me on a year-round personal appearance tour of theaters across the country to prove that I was a child."

Marie sang in a series of movie shorts including "Baby Rose Marie, the Child Wonder" in 1929 and appeared on most of the vaudeville circuits until vaudeville's demise. Among her friends was one of the country's most notorious gangsters.

"My father worked as an arsonist for Al Capone," Marie told People magazine in 2016. "He used to burn down your warehouse if things weren't going the right way, but I didn't know that at the time. I was a child star and to me Al was my 'Uncle Al,' my mother used to cook for all these guys. Years later when I was working Vegas with (casino owner and known mobster) Bugsy Siegel, I cooked for that generation, I guess I knew then."

In 1946 she married Bobby Guy, a trumpeter in Kay Kyser's band and later on top NBC radio shows in Hollywood. (They had a daughter, Georgiana). Bobby Guy was just 48 when he died suddenly of a blood infection, in 1964, a loss so devastating Marie wore black for a year and hesitated to take on work beyond "The Dick Van Dyke Show."

"Then Dean sang '(Smile),' to me and I couldn't help it, the tears began pouring down," she recalled in her memoir "Hold the Roses," published in 2003. "Then Dean kissed me and held me in his arms. It was quite a memorable moment."

As Rose Marie (she never used a last name professionally), she enjoyed new fame on television. Her quick, surefire timing made her ideal casting as a supporting player. She appeared on "The Doris Day Show," as the irreverent secretary to the star, and as Frank Fontana's mother on "Murphy Brown." For years she was a regular on the "Hollywood Squares" quiz show.

She also appeared in films including "International House" (as Baby Rose Marie in 1933, co-starring with W.C. Fields) and "Big Beat."

She starred in the Broadway musical "Top Banana" with Phil Silvers, but her experience on the film version resonated decades later in the aftermath of the multiple allegations of sexual harassment against Harvey Weinstein.

A producer suggested that she would get more screen time if she had sex with him.

"And in front of everybody, I go, 'You couldn't get it up if a flag went by,'" Marie, interviewed for "Wait for Your Laugh," recalled saying. "Which didn't sit too well with him. All my numbers were cut in the picture."

She received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2001. In 2017, she extended her reach to social media, her Twitter feed quickly attracting more than 100,000 followers.

"I was asked what I wanted my legacy to be," she wrote in one tweet. "My answer, 'That I was good at my job & loved every minute of it.' I wish that for everyone."

Marie is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Steven Rodrigues.

AP national writer Hillel Italie and the late entertainment writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.

December 29, 2017

 'Dick Van Dyke Show' actress Rose Marie has died
'Dick Van Dyke Show' actress Rose Marie has died

“I think everybody decided I was the first women’s libber because of that show. I’ve had many girls tell me, ‘Because of you, I became a writer. You gave me the inspiration,’” she said. “And I’m very proud of that.”

Rose Marie, who was married to musician Bobby Guy until his death in 1964, is survived by their daughter, Georgiana Marie, and son-in-law, Steven Rodrigues.

December 29, 2017

 Mobster acquitted in 'Goodfellas' heist gets prison in arson
Mobster acquitted in 'Goodfellas' heist gets prison in arson

Vincent Asaro, balding and bespectacled, reacted to the sentence with disgust.

"I don't care what happens to me at this point," he grumbled.

He looked at U.S. District Judge Allyne R. Ross, saying: "What you sentenced me to is a death sentence anyway."

The sentence was more than double what federal guidelines set out as punishment for the 2012 car torching, which prosecutors said resulted when Asaro directed Bonanno crime family associates to track down and set afire the car of a motorist he believed had cut him off.

Asaro, speaking before the announcement of the sentence, said he was "terribly sorry."

"I was on my way home," he said. "It happened. It just got out of hand."

The judge said she reviewed evidence from the trial she had presided over and cited proof Asaro had participated in a 1969 murder and had admitted his role and obtained jewelry from the armed robbery of more than $6 million in cash and jewelry from the Lufthansa terminal.

The prison term resulted from a road rage encounter between Asaro and a motorist who became "embroiled in a high-speed chase at the hands of an enraged Asaro," the FBI said.

Asaro contacted an associate with access to a local law enforcement database, identified the license plate information of the car and triggered a plan to burn the car in front of the motorist's home, said the head of New York's FBI office, William F. Sweeney Jr.

"The anger that propelled Asaro to action is reminiscent of so many scripted Hollywood dramas, but unlike the fame and fortune of the big screen, Asaro's story ends on a different note," Sweeney said in a release. "Today's sentence proves that living life in the fast lane is sure to be short lived."

Acting U.S. Attorney Bridget M. Rohde said Asaro's sentence was "for a lifetime of violent criminal activity."

Before the announcement of the sentence, defense attorney Elizabeth Macedonio blamed the government for the long prison term, saying prosecutors were "asking you to sentence him for crimes he was acquitted of that occurred 50 or 60 years ago."

Assistant U.S. Attorney Nicole Argentieri called Asaro a "one-man crime wave" and said he was a hero in his Queens neighborhood after he was acquitted at trial.

"It's time to send a message, to break the cycle," she said.

December 29, 2017

 Actress Rose Marie of 'Dick Van Dyke Show' fame dies at 94
Actress Rose Marie of 'Dick Van Dyke Show' fame dies at 94

But it was as feisty comedy writer Sally Rogers that Marie stretched the narrow confines of how women were portrayed on TV in the mid-20th century. Sally was an independent single woman who handled her job as adroitly as her male colleagues and who dated but refused to pine away for romance.

Rose Marie, who died Thursday at 94, was proud to have created a woman defined by her work, a rare sitcom character at the time who wasn't "a wife, mother, or housekeeper," she tweeted in 2017.

It represented one milestone in an extraordinary acting and singing career that started when she was a toddler, stretched over nearly a century and included success in theater, radio, nightclubs, movies and TV.

"There's never been a more engaging & multi-talented performer .... & always had audiences clamoring for more!!" Carl Reiner, creator of "The Dick Van Dyke Show," posted Thursday on Twitter.

Rose Marie had been resting in bed at her Los Angeles-area home when a caretaker found she had stopped breathing, said family spokesman Harlan Boll. The cause of death wasn't immediately disclosed.

"Heaven just got a whole lot funnier" read the tribute posted atop a photo of Rose Marie on her website.

The subject of the 2017 documentary "Wait for Your Laugh," Rose Marie often claimed she had the longest career in entertainment history. It spanned some 90 years, with co-stars ranging from W.C. Fields (in the 1933 movie "International House") to Garfield the cat.

The highlight for many was "The Dick Van Dyke Show," the 1961-66 sitcom widely loved for its sophisticated writing, inspired casting and insightful view of the inner workings of the then-new medium of television. Van Dyke starred as Rob Petrie, head writer for a hit comedy-variety show and Moore, in her first major role, played his wife Laura.

The blonde, raspy-voiced Rose Marie teamed with her pal Morey Amsterdam as assistant writers.

"The Dick Van Dyke Show" not only was an ideal vehicle for Rose Marie's comic gifts, but was a showcase for her singing, with Sally belting out "Come Rain or Come Shine" and other old favorites during nightclub and party scenes.

The actress had conflicts with Reiner, resenting that Moore was given more prominence than her on the show. Reiner, speaking in "Wait for Your Laugh," bluntly pushed back. "I used real strong language," he recalled. "I said, 'You both have beautiful legs. They wanna look at her legs.'"

Nominated three times for Emmys, Rose Marie had yet to turn 40 when she joined the Van Dyke cast, but had been an entertainer for more than 30 years.

She was born Rose Marie Mazetta of Italian-Polish parentage in New York City on Aug. 15, 1923. When she was 3, her mother entered her in an amateur talent contest in Atlantic City as Baby Rose Marie.

"My mother was terrified," she recalled in a 1992 interview with The Associated Press. "But I went out and sang 'What Can I Say, Dear, After I Say I'm Sorry?' and won the contest."

She began singing on radio and was a hit on "The Rudy Vallee Hour." NBC gave her a seven-year contract and her own show, 15 minutes on Sunday. Her powerful voice gave rise to rumors.

"Stories went around that I was really a 45-year-old midget," she remarked in 1992. "So they sent me on a year-round personal appearance tour of theaters across the country to prove that I was a child."

Rose Marie sang in a series of movie shorts including "Baby Rose Marie, the Child Wonder" in 1929 and appeared on most of the vaudeville circuits until vaudeville's demise. Among her friends was one of the country's most notorious gangsters.

"My father worked as an arsonist for Al Capone," Rose Marie told People magazine in 2016. "He used to burn down your warehouse if things weren't going the right way, but I didn't know that at the time. I was a child star and to me Al was my 'Uncle Al,' my mother used to cook for all these guys."

In 1946 she married Bobby Guy, a trumpeter in Kay Kyser's band and later on top NBC radio shows in Hollywood. They had a daughter, Georgiana. Guy was just 48 when he died suddenly of a blood infection in 1964 — a loss so devastating Rose Marie wore black for a year and hesitated to take on work beyond "The Dick Van Dyke Show."

"Then Dean sang '(Smile),' to me and I couldn't help it, the tears began pouring down," she recalled in her memoir "Hold the Roses," published in 2003. "Then Dean kissed me and held me in his arms. It was quite a memorable moment."

As Rose Marie (she never used a last name professionally), she enjoyed new fame on TV. Her surefire timing made her ideal casting as a supporting player and she appeared on "The Doris Day Show," as the irreverent secretary to the star, and as Frank Fontana's mother on "Murphy Brown." For years she was a regular on the "Hollywood Squares" quiz show.

Rose Marie starred in the Broadway musical "Top Banana" with Phil Silvers, but her experience on the 1954 film version resonated decades later in the aftermath of the multiple allegations of sexual harassment against Harvey Weinstein.

A producer suggested that she would get more screen time if she had sex with him.

"And in front of everybody, I go, 'You couldn't get it up if a flag went by,'" Rose Marie, interviewed for "Wait for Your Laugh," recalled saying. "Which didn't sit too well with him. All my numbers were cut in the picture."

She received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2001. In 2017, she extended her reach to social media, her Twitter feed quickly attracting more than 100,000 followers.

"I was asked what I wanted my legacy to be," she wrote in one tweet. "My answer, 'That I was good at my job & loved every minute of it.' I wish that for everyone."

Rose Marie is survived by her daughter and son-in-law Steven Rodrigues.

AP national writer Hillel Italie and the late entertainment writer Bob Thomas contributed to this report.

December 29, 2017

 How to score the best deal on a brand-new car before the new year arrives
How to score the best deal on a brand-new car before the new year arrives

In these final days of 2017, experts are advising potential car buyers that if they're considering a new set of wheels, now is a good time to put the pedal to the metal before the new year arrives.

According to DeLorenzo, manufacturers are closing out the books on the 2017 model year and still have a lot of cars left to sell.

"You're seeing some pretty sizable rebates and incentives," he told ABC News. "You can see discounts as much as 20 [percent] to 25 percent off the MSRP [manufacturer suggested retail price]. ... You'll see some deals anywhere from [$6,000] to $8,000 off of new cars."

DeLorenzo said buyers could see a bit deeper discounts this year because sales have slowed slightly -- down 2 percent over previous sales.

"They're trying to push the deals to get the volume back up to record levels," he said.

And if you're looking for a sedan, DeLorenzo said luck is on your side.

"We're seeing the biggest discounts on sedans. People have been moving away from the four-door family cars into SUVs and crossovers," he said. "You'll see fewer deals on cross-overs and SUVs and the really big deals on the four-door sedans, particularly in the midsize and full-size segments."

December 29, 2017

 Asian stocks drift higher on final trading day of 2017
Asian stocks drift higher on final trading day of 2017

KEEPING SCORE: Japan's Nikkei 225 rose 0.3 percent to 22,841.64 and China's Shanghai Composite Index added 0.2 percent to 3,302.01. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index gained 0.4 percent to 29,982.17. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 was the only market that went south. It fell 0.3 percent to 6,068.80. South Korean stock markets closed on Thursday.

ANALYST'S TAKE: Looking back the year of 2017, "markets have been disturbingly sanguine about risks," such as North Korean nuclear threats and the U.S. government's new foreign policy to put American interest first, said Mizuho Bank Ltd. in a daily commentary.

OIL: Benchmark U.S. crude rose 34 cents to $60.18 per barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It rose 20 cents to settle at $59.84 per barrel on Thursday. Brent crude, which is used to price international oils, gained 35 cents to $66.51 per barrel in London.

CURRENCIES: The dollar declined to 112.76 yen from 112.88 yen while the euro strengthened to $1.1946 from $1.1945.

December 29, 2017

 Global stocks little changed on final trading day of 2017
Global stocks little changed on final trading day of 2017

Global stocks were little changed on the final trading day of 2017 Friday but most stock markets are set to finish this year with gains.

ASIA'S DAY: Most Asian markets finished with modest gains. Japan's Nikkei 225 finished 0.1 percent lower at 22,764.94. The Tokyo benchmark index rose 19 percent in 2017. China's Shanghai Composite Index added 0.3 percent to 3,307.17. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index gained 0.2 percent to 29,919.15. But Australia's S&P/ASX 200 went south. It fell 0.4 percent to 6,065.10. South Korean stock markets closed on Thursday.

ANALYST'S TAKE: Looking back the year of 2017, "markets have been disturbingly sanguine about risks," such as North Korean nuclear threats and the U.S. government's new foreign policy to put American interest first, said Mizuho Bank Ltd. in a daily commentary.

CURRENCIES: The dollar declined to 112.56 yen from 112.88 yen while the euro strengthened to $1.1985 from $1.1945.

December 29, 2017

 Asian stocks drift higher on final trading day of 2017
Asian stocks drift higher on final trading day of 2017

KEEPING SCORE: Japan's Nikkei 225 rose 0.3 percent to 22,841.64 and China's Shanghai Composite Index added 0.2 percent to 3,302.01. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index gained 0.4 percent to 29,982.17. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 was the only market that went south. It fell 0.3 percent to 6,068.80. South Korean stock markets closed on Thursday.

ANALYST'S TAKE: Looking back the year of 2017, "markets have been disturbingly sanguine about risks," such as North Korean nuclear threats and the U.S. government's new foreign policy to put American interest first, said Mizuho Bank Ltd. in a daily commentary.

OIL: Benchmark U.S. crude rose 34 cents to $60.18 per barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It rose 20 cents to settle at $59.84 per barrel on Thursday. Brent crude, which is used to price international oils, gained 35 cents to $66.51 per barrel in London.

CURRENCIES: The dollar declined to 112.76 yen from 112.88 yen while the euro strengthened to $1.1946 from $1.1945.

December 29, 2017

 Global stocks little changed on final trading day of 2017
Global stocks little changed on final trading day of 2017

Global stocks were little changed on the final trading day of 2017 Friday but most stock markets are set to finish this year with gains.

ASIA'S DAY: Most Asian markets finished with modest gains. Japan's Nikkei 225 finished 0.1 percent lower at 22,764.94. The Tokyo benchmark index rose 19 percent in 2017. China's Shanghai Composite Index added 0.3 percent to 3,307.17. Hong Kong's Hang Seng index gained 0.2 percent to 29,919.15. But Australia's S&P/ASX 200 went south. It fell 0.4 percent to 6,065.10. South Korean stock markets closed on Thursday.

ANALYST'S TAKE: Looking back the year of 2017, "markets have been disturbingly sanguine about risks," such as North Korean nuclear threats and the U.S. government's new foreign policy to put American interest first, said Mizuho Bank Ltd. in a daily commentary.

CURRENCIES: The dollar declined to 112.56 yen from 112.88 yen while the euro strengthened to $1.1985 from $1.1945.

December 29, 2017

 Residents in high-tax states rush to file property taxes before new rules take effect
Residents in high-tax states rush to file property taxes before new rules take effect

Residents in New York, like others around the country, are rushing to file because the new tax code, signed into law last week, limits the amount of state and local taxes people can deduct on their federal returns, according to Donald Clavin, town receiver of taxes in Hempstead, New York. The change could cost some homeowners, especially those in high-tax states, thousands of dollars.

He said there will now be a $10,000 cap on the amount of property taxes that can be written off.

The new deductions cap will impact homeowners in some states much more than others, including those in California, Connecticut, New York and New Jersey, where the average state and local deductions surpassed $17,000 in 2015, according to an analysis by The Associated Press.

"You can partially prepay or fully prepay and get your deductions for your property tax payment," Cuomo said in a statement. "At least this device will postpone the pain for one year."

Officials in Montgomery County, Maryland, also passed legislation to allow residents to prepay their property taxes.

“There may be other steps that we can and should take going forward to help others hurt by the federal bill, and we should be supportive of those. But this is the only step we at the local level can and should take to help our residents right now,” he added.

Experts warned that homeowners should consult their accountants before prepaying.

He said his office plans to extend its hours on Saturday and Sunday -- the final two days of the year.

December 29, 2017

 Commodities poised for a run in 2018
Commodities poised for a run in 2018

While domestic and foreign economies hum along, fueling overall growth in the domestic stock market, related trends are likely to push up prices of commodities and materials.

Demand for commodities is increasing globally. Just about every economy in the world, depressed for years longer than ours after our woes from the 2008 financial crisis hit their shores, is now accelerating in what economists are calling synchronized growth because they seem to be rising in lockstep.

Already, the commodity of oil is headed upward, with long-depressed prices close to their historical average at about $60 a barrel. Trend data suggests that domestic energy stocks are gaining momentum against the energy sector as a whole relative to the S&P 500.

Some global oil producers might not extend production cuts, increasing supply and depressing prices. But Saudi Arabia, the planet’s biggest producer, is expected to do everything it can to increase market prices as Saudi Aramco, the state-owned production company, prepares to take part of the company public in 2018 and seeks to elevate prices for its initial public offering.

Analysts expect demand to rise for energy commodities, base metals and timber -- the building blocks of industry, manufacturing and construction. In turn, this would drive up earnings and stock prices of materials companies, which extract raw materials through mining, forestry and energy exploration.

Investing in commodities exchanges, even via exchange-traded funds (ETFs), can be tricky for long-term individual investors who like to sit back and not worry about sudden price fluctuations. But for those who stay on top of things, commodities-based funds and materials stocks present feasible near-term investing opportunities. Commodities have only had a place in the sun every so often, and the sun may shine brightly on them in 2018.

A bellwether with a respectable record, highly-versatile copper is used in manufacturing, industrial processes, electronic products and plumbing. Copper is so reliably foretelling of the overall commodities market that the traders have dubbed it Dr. Copper.

Of course, the commodities train and its caboose could be derailed. Problems in China, stemming from ballooning debt and tenuous credit arrangements, could decrease demand by the world’s biggest commodity consumer. Or a significant recession in the U.S., though unlikely, could throw cold water on the party.

But generally, the outlook for commodities and materials in 2018 is quite sanguine.

December 29, 2017