Clinton, Sanders, Warren to headline American Federation of Teachers convention in Pittsburgh

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in New York City, April 6, 2017.  (Associated Press)

Big-name Democrats will join thousands of educators in Pittsburgh this weekend when the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) holds its biennial convention. 

Members of the National Education Association, which supported Clinton’s failed presidential bid in 2016, will be present as well. 

The ruling was widely bemoaned by advocates of organized labor, including AFT President Randi Weingarten.

“We are at this solemn and scary inflection point in our country where there are really troubling trends and amazing activism at the same time,” Weingarten said Tuesday, according to the Examiner.

She noted that membership in the AFT has skyrocketed because of a strategy implemented before the Supreme Court ruling.

The AFT, which represents 1.7 million teachers, has 3,000 affiliates throughout the country, making it the nation's largest teacher union. 

The convention will take place in downtown Pittsburgh at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. 

Earlier this year, thousands of teachers in West Virginia, Arizona, Colorado, Oklahoma and Kentucky walked off their jobs, demanding pay raises and more funding for their classrooms.

This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. ©2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.

 

July 11, 2018

Sources: Fox News

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    1 July 18, 2018
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    1 July 18, 2018

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