COLUMN: Little long-term thinking in what Trump says and does

The president has an unbelievable ability to garner press and make folks respond, but there seems little long-term thinking in what he says and does.

And giving Trump some genius level of strategic credit because everyone is focused on him, and is responding to him, is a bit like giving credit to the teenager who got the keys to his parents car and drove erratically on the highway, because all the other cars on the road and pedestrians had to react to him.

Let us not confuse stream of consciousness actions with strategic planning and foresight.

In the span of just a few days Trump managed to do the following:

1. Help Kim Jong Un achieve a tremendous propaganda victory by standing shoulder-to-shoulder with him on the world stage, and letting Kim wrap his flag of dictatorship with the American flag of democracy. This enhanced Kim’s status among other nations and gave him both a domestic advantage in North Korea and an international platform to engage from. This is something he, his father, and other leaders of North Korea have only dreamed of over the last 70 years.

2. Celebrated the hated dictator of North Korea, who has brutalized his own people, complimenting him effusively within hours of criticizing a longtime democratic ally, the popular leader Justin Trudeau of Canada, and threatening our neighbor with ill-advised tariffs. This is an amazing turnaround for an American foreign policy that looked to Canada for support on international agreements, at the United Nations, and in conflicts and wars around the globe. Neither of these actions will make America safer, nor help the working class of our country economically. I think Trump just pushed the limits of what “Canada nice” will tolerate, and for this president, he has asserted a policy that our allies will see as “no good country goes unpunished."

3. Here is where the logic fails me: So President Trump, with Republican support, saw the Iran nuclear agreement, which had tons of concessions and detailed commitments as bad and needing to be reversed, while the deal with North Korea, with no concessions and no real commitments from Kim, is good and readily embraced. Color me confused on this, or maybe I just smell good old-fashioned cooked-to-perfection political hypocrisy.

4. On his way to Canada, Trump speculated that Russia should be let back into the G-7, ignoring the fact the Russians were kicked out because they invaded and took over Crimea. In the midst of these idle thoughts expressed out loud, Trump blamed President Obama for the Russian invasion of Crimea and basically said since it had nothing to do with Trump, why should he hold it against Putin. This would be like Harry Truman, after FDR died, blaming Roosevelt for the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and deciding not to continue the war in the Pacific because it was “Roosevelt’s problem” and then inviting Japan over for a meeting.

For many Americans, acts and words such as this by our president have become the new normal and we often lose focus on their real-world impact. We must stay alert and not let chaos become expected. Let us not get tired and lost in the maelstrom of maddening, messy and mercurial meanderings of the man from Mar-a-Lago.

 

June 13, 2018

Sources: ABC News

Related news

  •  Sanders says she was told to leave Virginia restaurant

    Sanders says she was told to leave Virginia restaurant

    ooted from a Virginia restaurant because she works for President Donald Trump, setting off a fierce debate about whether politics should play a role in how administration officals are treated in public.</p><p> Sanders was the latest to experience a brusque reception in such a setting.</p><p> Sanders tweeted that she was told by the owner of the Red Hen in Lexington, Virginia, that she had to "leave because I work for @POTUS and I politely left." She said the episode Friday evening said far more about the owner of the restaurant than it did about her.</p><p> "I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so," Sanders said in the tweet from her official account, which generated 22,000 replies in about an hour.</p><p> The restaurant's co-owner Stephanie Wilkinson told The Washington Post that her staff had called her to report Sanders was in the restaurant. She cited several reasons, including the concerns of several restaurant employees who were gay and knew Sanders had defended Trump's desire to bar transgender people from the military.</p><p> "Tell me what you want me to do. I can ask her to leave," Wilkinson told her staff, she said. "They said yes."</p><p> Wilkinson said that she talked to Sanders privately and that Sanders's response was immediate: "That's fine. I'll go."</p><p> Employees at the restaurant told The Associated Press that Wilkinson wasn't available for further comment.</p><p> Over the weekend, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich weighed in on the increasingly nasty tone of politics. Gingrich was known for setting a more combative tone in congressional politics in the 1990s.</p><p> "The increasing personal nastiness toward people who work for President Trump reflects the left's understanding that they are losing," Gingrich said in a tweet. "Nastiness reflects desperation, not strength. They can't win the argument so they use nastiness. Sad and dangerous."</p><p> Lexington, located in the Shenandoah Valley and a three-hour drive southwest of the nation's capital, is politically a spot of blue in a sea of red. It sided with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election, by a 2-1 margin. It's the county seat of Rockbridge County, which went with Trump by a similar margin. And it is home to Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University.</p><p> Sanders' treatment at the restaurant created a social media commotion with people on both sides weighing in, including her father, Mike Huckabee, a former Arkansas governor and Republican presidential candidate.</p><p> "Bigotry. On the menu at Red Hen Restaurant in Lexington VA. Or you can ask for the 'Hate Plate,'" Huckabee said in a tweet, quickly generating 2,000 replies in about 30 minutes. "And appetizers are 'small plates for small minds.'"</p><p> Tom Lomax, a local business owner, brought flowers to the restaurant Saturday afternoon as a show of support. He called Wilkinson a "force of nature" and "one of the biggest drivers of the downtown."</p><p> "We support our own here, great little community we have," he said.</p><p> Stephen Russek, a former restaurant owner in the area, said "they had no right to do that."</p><p> "You have your political opinions, you don't throw somebody out of your restaurant," Russek, who lives nearby, said. "They ought to be shut down."</p><p> The separation of families trying to enter the U.S. at the southern border has intensified political differences and passions that were already at elevated levels during the Trump presidency.</p><p> Earlier in the week, Trump's Homeland Security secretary, Kirstjen Nielsen, cut short a working dinner at a Mexican restaurant in Washington after protesters shouted, "Shame!" until she left. A few days earlier, Trump aide Stephen Miller, a key adviser on immigration, was accosted by someone at a different Mexican restaurant in the city, who called him "a fascist," according to the New York Post. The Trumps don't get out a lot socially in Washington and Trump often dines at BLT Prime in the Trump International Hotel or at Trump properties elsewhere when he does go out.</p><p> Ari Fleischer, who was a press secretary for President George W. Bush, tweeted Saturday: "I guess we're heading into an America with Democrat-only restaurants, which will lead to Republican-only restaurants. Do the fools who threw Sarah out, and the people who cheer them on, really want us to be that kind of country?"</p>

    1 June 24, 2018
  •  DOJ gives Congress new classified documents on Russia probe

    DOJ gives Congress new classified documents on Russia probe

    ns new classified information related to the Russia investigation after lawmakers had threatened to hold officials in contempt of Congress or even impeach them.</p><p> A spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul Ryan said Saturday that the department has partially complied with subpoenas from the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees after officials turned over more than a thousand new documents this week. House Republicans had given the Justice Department and FBI a Friday deadline for all documents, most of which are related to the origins of the FBI's Russia investigation and the handling of its probe into Democrat Hillary Clinton's emails. Ryan spokeswoman AshLee Strong said the department asked for more time and they will get it — for now.</p><p> "Our efforts have resulted in the committees finally getting access to information that was sought months ago, but some important requests remain to be completed," Strong said in a statement Saturday. "Additional time has been requested for the outstanding items, and based on our understanding of the process we believe that request is reasonable. We expect the department to meet its full obligations to the two committees."</p><p> The efforts by the Justice Department over the last week to deliver documents to the House Republicans appear to have at least temporarily diffused a monthslong standoff with Congress. Democrats have criticized the multiple document requests, charging that they are intended to discredit the department and distract from or even undermine special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into the Trump campaign's Russia ties and whether there was obstruction of justice.</p><p> In the letter, the Justice Department's acting assistant director of congressional affairs, Jill Tyson, said Nunes had also asked for transcripts of conversations between confidential human sources and Trump campaign officials. She said the department had referred that request to National Intelligence Director Dan Coats.</p><p> Tyson's letter said the department had also given Nunes materials related to the department's guidelines under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Republicans have for months questioned whether the department abused that act when prosecutors and agents in 2016 applied for and received a secret warrant to monitor the communications of Trump campaign associate Carter Page.</p><p> The department is also working to provide outstanding documents related to former British spy Christopher Steele, Tyson said, and the dossier he compiled of anti-Trump research during the presidential campaign. Trump and congressional Republicans have charged that the research in the dossier, paid for by Clinton's campaign and the Democratic National Committee, was used inappropriately to obtain the warrant on Page.</p><p> House Speaker Paul Ryan has backed the document requests, and he led a meeting last week with committee chairmen and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to try to resolve the issue. In a television interview two days after that meeting, on June 17, Nunes said if they don't get the documents by this week, "there's going to be hell to pay" and indicated the House could act on contempt or even impeachment. A spokesman for Nunes did not immediately respond to a request for comment Saturday.</p><p> The letter says FBI is also working to address a request about "proposed, recommended or actual" surveillance on the Clinton Foundation. Tyson said the department was responding in a separate, classified letter, and that the request had proven "difficult to address." She said the department hoped to talk to lawmakers further about it.</p><p> In the letters, Tyson said the department had built "new tools" to search top secret documents and had diverted resources from other congressional requests.</p>

    1 June 24, 2018
  • Critic of Trump border policies took cash from private-prison operators: report

    Critic of Trump border policies took cash from private-prison operators: report

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>A vocal critic of President Donald Trump's immigration policies is a top recipent of campaign donations from operators of privately run prisons, according to a report.</p><p>The sum includes $5,000 from the Florida-based political-action committee for the GEO Group, the nation’s largest private-prison firm, the data show.</p><p>GEO Group operates the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., which has faced protests and lawsuits alleging mistreatment of detainees facing deportation, the Times reported.</p><p>Aside from the GEO Group, Murray also received a $2,500 donation from the PAC for Management and Training Corp., a Utah company that runs facilities housing immigrant detainees, according to the Times.</p><p>Eli Zupnik, a Murray campaign spokesman, dismissed the donations as “inconsequential,” telling the Times that she had received thousands of donations in her last campaign, “none of which would influence her decisions.”</p><p>“Senator Murray is a leading critic of President Trump’s horrendous policies that are increasing the needless and inhumane detention of immigrants and families,” Zupnik wrote in an emailed statement obtained by the Times.</p><p>&ldquo;Senator Murray is a leading critic of President Trump&rsquo;s horrendous policies that are increasing the needless and inhumane detention of immigrants and families.&rdquo; </p><p>“She has spent years working to shine a spotlight on what she called the ‘highly disturbing’ conditions at private detention centers, and she has been consistently aggressive and vocal in her opposition to federal spending on for-profit prisons that lack any meaningful transparency or accountability.”</p><p>Murray has condemned the Trump administration over the separation of children from parents and has been critical of federal taxpayer money going to private prisons.</p><p>Murray sent a letter to HHS Secretary Alex M. Azar, demanding to know “how parents and children are being informed about each other’s safety, where they are located, the age of the children and if the tender-aged children are being cared for appropriately, and if and when parents and children will be reunited,” the Times reported.</p><p>“We have no idea what they’re doing,” Murray said. “It is just beyond reprehensible that the administration is not answering these questions.”</p><p>U.S. Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Auburn, was the only other Washington state member of Congress to receive private-prison firm money in 2016 -- a $2,500 donation also from the GEO Group’s PAC, the Times reported.</p><p>Amy Lieu is a news editor and reporter for Fox News.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 June 24, 2018
  • Sarah Sanders booted so restaurant could uphold 'certain standards,' co-owner says: report

    Sarah Sanders booted so restaurant could uphold 'certain standards,' co-owner says: report

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>White House press secretary Sarah Sanders says she was kicked out of a Virginia restaurant because she works for President Trump&#x3b; reaction on &#x27;Cavuto Live.&#x27;</p><p>After her chef reportedly told her that “the staff is a little concerned,” Wilkinson left her home and headed for the restaurant.</p><p>“I’m not a huge fan of confrontation,” Wilkinson told the Post. “I have a business, and I want the business to thrive.”</p><p>“This feels like the moment in our democracy when people have to make uncomfortable actions and decisions to uphold their morals,” she continued. She also reportedly described the actions of Trump’s White House as “inhumane and unethical.”</p><p>&ldquo;This feels like the moment in our democracy when people have to make uncomfortable actions and decisions to uphold their morals.&rdquo;</p><p>After arriving, Wilkinson recalled to the Post that Sanders’ party had some appetizers on the table, but had not yet received their entrees. She said she spoke to her employees, asking them how they wanted her to move forward.</p><p>“I can ask her to leave,” she suggested to the staff, according to the Post.</p><p>Wilkinson then told the Post that she approached Sanders, introduced herself, then asked Sanders to “come out to the patio” to talk.</p><p>“I was babbling a little, but I got my point across in a polite and direct fashion,” Wilkinson told the Post. “I explained that the restaurant has certain standards that I feel it has to uphold, such as honesty, and compassion, and cooperation,” before saying, “I’d like to ask you to leave.”</p><p>&ldquo;I was babbling a little, but I got my point across in a polite and direct fashion. I explained that the restaurant has certain standards that I feel it has to uphold.&quot;</p><p>She reportedly said the press secretary replied simply by saying “That’s fine. I’ll go,” before she and her entire party left the restaurant.</p><p>Wilkinson told the Post that the Sanders group had “offered to pay,” but Wilkinson declined, telling them that there was no charge for their order.</p><p>“Her actions say far more about her than about me,” she tweeted. “I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so.”</p><p>Looking back, Wilkinson told the Post, she &quot;would have done the same thing again.&quot;</p><p>Meanwhile, an unaffiliated restaurant in Washington, also called the Red Hen, was working to convince customers that it was not involved in the Sanders dispute, which took place in Virginia.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 June 24, 2018
  • DOJ hands over documents to GOP committees after subpoena threat

    DOJ hands over documents to GOP committees after subpoena threat

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>The Justice Department faces deadline to turn over all documents requested by congressional investigators&#x3b; chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge reports from Washington.</p><p>The Justice Department this week gave House Republicans some of the documents they seek related to the Russia election-meddling investigation and Hillary Clinton email probe -- after lawmakers threatened to hold officials in contempt for stonewalling.</p><p>House Oversight Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., said on &quot;Fox News Sunday&quot; that House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., had warned that “there’s going to be action on the floor of the House this week if FBI and DOJ do not comply with our subpoena request.”</p><p>The House Judiciary Committee and House Intelligence Committee had requested more than a million documents from the FBI and DOJ related to the Clinton investigation and surveillance of members of the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential campaign.</p><p>But a spokesperson for Ryan told The Associated Press on Saturday that the department had partially complied with the subpoenas and had turned over more than a thousand new documents.</p><p>&quot;Our efforts have resulted in the committees finally getting access to information that was sought months ago, but some important requests remain to be completed,&quot; the spokesperson, AshLee Strong, said in a statement Saturday.&nbsp; &quot;Additional time has been requested for the outstanding items, and based on our understanding of the process we believe that request is reasonable. We expect the department to meet its full obligations to the two committees.&quot;</p><p>House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, R-Calif., who has been a central figure in requesting the documents, was provided a classified letter about whether the FBI used “confidential human sources” before it started its investigation in Russia ties to the Trump campaign.</p><p>Republicans have targeted the circumstances as to how the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant was obtained to monitor Trump aide Carter Page and the possible use of an informant who spoke to members of Trump’s campaign.&nbsp;</p><p>AP reported that the DOJ is also working to provide documents related to former British spy Christopher Steele, who was behind the lurid and unverified anti-Trump dossier, which Republicans say was used to obtain the FISA warrant.</p><p>The partial fulfillment of the request is likely to soothe what was at one point an escalating standoff between House Republicans and department officials.</p><p>Gowdy told &quot;Fox News Sunday&quot; last week that &quot;the full panoply of constitutional weapons available to the people’s house&quot; are on the table, including contempt of Congress.</p><p>&quot;I don’t want the drama; I want the documents,&quot; Gowdy added.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 June 23, 2018
  •  Huckabee tweets apparent gang photo he says is Nancy Pelosi's 'campaign committee'

    Huckabee tweets apparent gang photo he says is Nancy Pelosi's 'campaign committee'

    take back of the House," Huckabee tweeted alongside the photo. </p><p> Huckabee, who ran for the Republican nomination for president in 2008 and 2016, received widespread criticism for the tweet, which was also liked by more than 15,000 Twitter users and retweeted over 6,400 times as of Saturday afternoon. </p><p> Outrage erupted across the nation after the controversial "zero tolerance" immigration policy was put into effect last month by Trump's administration. The policy, enacted by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in early May, stated that everyone who tries to cross the southern border illegally would be criminally prosecuted, and that parents will be separated from their children as they await trial. </p><p> Trump, appearing to cave to immense political pressure, signed an executive order on Wednesday ending the practice of forcibly separating immigrant families at the border with Mexico. But thousands of children have already been taken away from their detained parents.</p>

    1 June 23, 2018
  • Romney walks fine line on Trump amid Utah primary fight

    Romney walks fine line on Trump amid Utah primary fight

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>CEO of McLaughlin &amp; Asscociates John McLaughlin speaks on Mitt Romney&#x27;s Utah GOP nomination failure</p><p>GOP Utah Senate nominee Mitt Romney is walking a careful line when it comes to his stance on President Trump as he prepares for a primary on Tuesday against a conservative challenger.</p><p>Romney, who was once a stern Trump critic, has refrained from openly scrapping with the president since he declared his intent to run to replace outgoing Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah.</p><p>While he is the overwhelming favorite, he was forced into a runoff after he failed to win 60 percent of delegates votes at the state's party convention.</p><p>Romney has a choppy history with the president. While Trump backed Romney's presidential run in 2012, Romney and Trump feuded publicly for over a year as Trump ran for the 2016 nomination. The height of Romney’s criticisms came in March 2016, when he blasted Trump in a major speech.</p><p>&quot;Here's what I know: Donald Trump is a phony, a fraud,&quot; Romney said. &quot;His promises are as worthless as a degree from Trump University. He's playing members of the American public for suckers: He gets a free ride to the White House, and all we get is a lousy hat.”</p><p>Trump responded by calling Romney “a total joke” and a “disaster candidate.”</p><p>But after Trump won the election a few months later, Romney appeared to make peace with Trump and met with him as he was considered for secretary of state.</p><p>But just months later, Romney slammed Trump’s response to a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August 2017, saying he caused “racists to rejoice.”</p><p>Despite that, Trump endorsed Romney for his Senate bid while Romney has in turn refrained from explicitly criticizing the president. This month he even went so far as to predict that the GOP would rally around Trump and that he would be re-elected comfortably in 2020.</p><p>&quot;I think President Trump will be renominated by my party easily and I think he'll be re-elected solidly,&quot; Romney told supporters in Utah.</p><p>Yet there have been signs that Romney still has the potential to be a thorn in Trump’s side if he wins in November in the model of outgoing Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake or fellow former presidential nominee Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.</p><p>Romney has condemned the practice of separating families caught crossing the border illegally, saying it “puts America in a terrible light around the world.”</p><p>He also sent out a tweet this week agreeing with Laura Bush’s criticisms of the practice, saying “we need a more compassionate answer.” However, amid a firestorm of criticism aimed at Trump, Romney’s remarks have been relatively mild.</p><p>Romney may be particularly cautious of challenging Trump until he has put away the primary challenge from the right from state Rep. Mike Kennedy -- who is running as the homegrown, more conservative choice. Whoever goes through to the election will have a substantial advantage against Democrat Jenny Wilson.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 June 23, 2018
  •  Trump says Obama kept migrants 'wrapped in foil' in cages: 'We do a much better job'

    Trump says Obama kept migrants 'wrapped in foil' in cages: 'We do a much better job'

    FOIL” We do a much better job while at the same time maintaining a MUCH stronger Border! Mainstream Fake Media hates this story.</p><p> The Daily Caller article was posted on Tuesday, when public outrage over the family separations was at a height. On Wednesday, the president signed an executive order to end the policy and keep migrant parents and children together. </p><p> The Obama administration also used detention facilities for migrants who crossed the border illegally but it did not engage in widespread family separations.</p>

    1 June 23, 2018
  •  Sarah Sanders says she was told to leave restaurant because she works for Trump

    Sarah Sanders says she was told to leave restaurant because she works for Trump

    ers tweeted. "I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so." </p><p> Sanders' father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, weighed in, calling the incident an example of "bigotry." </p><p> "Bigotry. On the menu at Red Hen Restaurant in Lexington VA. Or you can ask for the 'Hate Plate,'" Huckabee tweeted. </p><p> A man who says he was Sanders' waiter at the farm-to-table restaurant wrote on Facebook that he only served her for a couple minutes before the owner "asked her to leave and she complied." </p><p> "Her family left on their own accord, we didn't actually refuse service or 'kick her out,'" he wrote in the Facebook post. </p><p> Responding to comments on his post, which has been shared hundreds of times, the man wrote that "the owner felt that Sarah's moral decisions conflicted with her own." </p><p> ABC News reached out to the owner and the waiter for comment but did not immediately heard back Saturday afternoon. </p><p> The incident occurred after a week of widespread outrage over the Trump administration's policy of forcibly separating migrant families who illegally cross the southern border from Mexico. </p><p> Trump signed an executive order Wednesday to end the practice of separating migrant families. But well over a thousand children remain apart from their parents, and many continue to criticize the president's "zero tolerance" approach to illegal immigration. </p><p> Sanders wasn't the first official to be personally confronted with public anger over the administration's immigration policy. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, who oversees the nation's borders, was bombarded by protesters on Tuesday night while she dined at an upscale Mexican restaurant in Washington, D.C. </p><p> Video of the confrontation was posted to Facebook. </p><p> The protesters, members of Metro DC Democratic Socialists of America, loudly booed at Nielsen and repeatedly shouted "shame." </p><p> "Secretary Nielsen, how dare you spend your evening here eating dinner as you're complicit in the separation and deportation of over 10,000 children separated from their parents," one protester yelled. "How can you enjoy a Mexican dinner as you’re deporting and imprisoning tens of thousands of people who come here seeking asylum in the United States?"</p>

    1 June 23, 2018
  •  Sarah Sanders says she was told to leave restaurant because she works for Trump

    Sarah Sanders says she was told to leave restaurant because she works for Trump

    ers tweeted. "I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so." </p><p> Sanders' father, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, weighed in, calling the incident an example of "bigotry." </p><p> "Bigotry. On the menu at Red Hen Restaurant in Lexington VA. Or you can ask for the 'Hate Plate,'" Huckabee tweeted. </p><p> A man who says he was Sanders' waiter at the farm-to-table restaurant wrote on Facebook that he only served her for a couple minutes before the owner "asked her to leave and she complied." </p><p> "Her family left on their own accord, we didn't actually refuse service or 'kick her out,'" he wrote in the Facebook post. </p><p> Responding to comments on his post, which has been shared hundreds of times, the man wrote that "the owner felt that Sarah's moral decisions conflicted with her own." </p><p> ABC News reached out to the owner and the waiter for comment but did not immediately heard back Saturday afternoon. </p><p> The incident occurred after a week of widespread outrage over the Trump administration's policy of forcibly separating migrant families who illegally cross the southern border from Mexico. </p><p> Trump signed an executive order Wednesday to end the practice of separating migrant families. But well over a thousand children remain apart from their parents, and many continue to criticize the president's "zero tolerance" approach to illegal immigration. </p><p> Sanders wasn't the first official to be personally confronted with public anger over the administration's immigration policy. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, who oversees the nation's borders, was bombarded by protesters on Tuesday night while she dined at an upscale Mexican restaurant in Washington, D.C. </p><p> Video of the confrontation was posted to Facebook. </p><p> The protesters, members of Metro DC Democratic Socialists of America, loudly booed at Nielsen and repeatedly shouted "shame." </p><p> "Secretary Nielsen, how dare you spend your evening here eating dinner as you're complicit in the separation and deportation of over 10,000 children separated from their parents," one protester yelled. "How can you enjoy a Mexican dinner as you’re deporting and imprisoning tens of thousands of people who come here seeking asylum in the United States?"</p>

    1 June 23, 2018

Comments

Earn free bitcoin