Young people are lonelier than older generations. Here's how parents can help.

“What this comes down is that we, as a society, are experiencing a lack of connection,” says Douglas Nemecek, M.D., chief medical officer for Behavioral Health at Cigna.

Most alarming: Loneliness scores rose among the generations, with the youngest generation, Gen Z or the iGen, born between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s, scoring a 48.3 overall, as opposed to Millennials, who scored a 45.3., Gen X, who scored an also dismal 45.1 and Baby Boomers, who scored a 42.4. Those of grandparenting or great-grandparenting age, the Greatest Generation, were the least lonely, with a score of 38.6.

Sadly, it seems the younger you are, the lonelier you feel. “While we know that this is a group that’s coming of age and making life transitions, these findings give us a clear and surprising picture of how this generation perceives themselves,” says Nemecek. “It’s important that the communities these young people are a part of take note and explore solutions. It’s critical that they’re have spaces where young people can connect face-to-face to form meaningful relationships.”

Research has found that loneliness has the same impact on mortality as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, making it even more dangerous than obesity.

Parents can also help their teens by focusing on these healthy behaviors:

 

May 14, 2018

Sources: NBC

Related news

  • 
	The keto diet protects your eyesight

    The keto diet protects your eyesight

    coma - one of the leading causes of blindness - according to new research.</p><p>Swapping bread, pasta and potatoes for foods high in fat boosts the optic nerve and its connections to the brain, the study by Northeast Ohio Medical University found.</p><p>It has also been shown to ease certain neurological issues like seizures in epilepsy patients.</p><p>But this study in mice is one of the first to show that the low fat diet stopped cells in the retina at the back of the eye from degenerating.</p><p>The study published in JNeurosci adds to others that have found the diet protects against brain conditions including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and motor neurone disease</p><p>The lab rodents had been genetically engineered to develop glaucoma - but didn't do so.</p><p>Caused by pressure inside the eyes the progressive disease can lead to blindness in one or both eyes.</p><p>It damages cells that transmit visual information to the brain - leading to vision loss</p><p>The study published in JNeurosci adds to others that have found the diet protects against brain conditions including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and motor neurone disease.</p><p>Diabetics are more prone to glaucoma suggest a link to stress to the metabolism - the bodily process in which food is broken down and transformed into energy.</p><p>So Professor Denise Inman and colleagues fed the modified mice a diet composed of nearly 90 per cent fat for two months.</p><p>This maintained the health of the retinal cells by making more energy available to them, they said.</p><p>The researchers said a ketogenic diet may help to maintain vision in patients with glaucoma.</p><p>Prof Inman, of Northeast Ohio medical University, said: 'Importantly, the intervention was successful despite the animals being on the cusp of significant glaucoma progression.'</p><p>About 600,000 Britons suffer from glaucoma - a permanent narrowing of vision usually caused by damage to the optic nerve.</p><p>It results from an excessive build-up of liquid in the eye called aqueous humour. As nerve damage gets worse, vision progressively narrows.</p><p>Eye drops are usually given first to those at risk of glaucoma, but used alone these often fail to control eye pressure well enough.</p><p>Many then undergo laser eye surgery - but this can also fail to work.</p><p>Prof Inman said degeneration of the retina can arise from metabolic stress through damaged mitochondria - tiny bits of DNA that power cells.</p><p>She said: 'We placed both sexes of mice destined to develop glaucoma and mice of a control strain on a ketogenic diet to encourage mitochondrial function.'</p><p>After eight weeks there was an increase in mitochondria, more energy availability, less cell damage and better signalling to the brain.</p><p>The mice also had more disease-fighting antioxidants.</p><p>Prof Inman said metabolic decline of nerve cells was reversed 'as a result of placing the animals on a ketogenic diet.'</p><p>The Keto diet forces the body to burn fat for energy - effectively starving it of carbohydrates but not calories.</p><p>Prof Inman said: 'Ketogenic diets have been used to limit neurodegeneration.'</p><p>She said they have been found to improve motor function and cognition in models of Alzheimer's while decreasing disease progression.</p><p>One study found the diet combated motor neurone disease by increasing the number of brain cells.</p><p>Prof Inman said: 'Exploration of the mechanisms of Ketogenic diet protection often cite improvement of mitochondrial metabolic efficiency or normalisation of metabolism.'</p><p>She said it also changes the metabolic profile of glial cells - found in the central nervous system.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • 
	Yogurt appetizer fights inflammation

    Yogurt appetizer fights inflammation

    lammation, hypertension and boost gut health, a new study has found. </p><p>Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison asked 60 premenopausal women - half obese and half normal weight - to eat 12 ounces of low-fat sweetened yogurt every day. </p><p>Meanwhile, another 60 ate the equivalent amount of a non-dairy snack. </p><p>They found that, even in those who ate plenty of meat and carbs, the yogurt appetizer helped to off-set the inflammation caused by saturated fat. </p><p>The study is the latest to show fermented dairy products like yogurt and cheese can have transformative effects on gut health and inflammation, running against the popular health fad of shunning dairy products.  </p><p>Middle-aged women who ate 12oz of yogurt a day saw a decrease in inflammation</p><p>'We saw an immediate effect, that lasted for nine weeks, and we hypothesized that this would improve over time,' lead author Dr Brad Bolling, a professor of food science, told Daily Mail Online.  </p><p>Chronic inflammation is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, and other diseases.</p><p>Inflammation can be good as it is part of the body's innate immune system, our first line of defence against illness and injury.</p><p>But when it lasts too long it can lead to where the body essentially attacks itself, wreaking biological havoc on our organs and systems.</p><p>Anti-inflammatory medications like aspirin, naproxen, hydrocortisone and prednisone can help mitigate the effects of chronic inflammation but each carries their own risks and side effects.</p><p>So for the past two decades scientists have looked at alternatives, particularly safe, gentle, long-term treatments.</p><p>But results have been mixed sparking a debate whether dairy products are pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory.</p><p>Yogurt, Dr Bolling said, appears to be the most promising dairy product to fight dangerous inflammation. </p><p>'We were interested in the entire category of dairy because in some prior human intervention studies where obese individuals had consumed milk, cheese and yogurt there was a general anti-inflammatory effect,' Dr Bolling told Daily Mail Online. </p><p>'So we wanted to look closer because we had to choose one. Yogurt looked most promising in terms of the gut health connection. </p><p>'There had been one or two smaller gut health intervention studies using yogurt, and one in animals.'</p><p>Yogurt is made by infusing milk with 'good' bacteria, causing it to ferment. These live bacteria stimulate the gut's friendly bacteria and suppress harmful bacteria.</p><p>For the study, one of the largest human intervention studies to look at yogurt, he picked a simple low-fat sweetened yogurt, primarily because it was the most widely available in the US. </p><p>'There was nothing really special or fancy about the composition,' he added. </p><p>Half were assigned to eat 12oz of low-fat yogurt every day for nine weeks while the other half ate a non-dairy pudding.</p><p>Fasting blood samples were taken at various points to evaluate an assortment of biomarkers that scientists have used over the years to measure endotoxin exposure and inflammation.</p><p>The participants saw a significant drop in harmful inflammatory molecules entering the blood stream.</p><p>The yogurt appetizer also improved glucose metabolism in the obese by speeding the reduction of post-meal blood glucose levels.</p><p>The findings add further weight to the idea that fermented dairy may dampen chronic inflammation, a factor in inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis and asthma.</p><p>'The results indicate that ongoing consumption of yogurt may be having a general anti-inflammatory effect,' Dr Bolling explained.  </p><p>It is not clear whether there is an 'upper limit' for how much yogurt a day is beneficial.   </p><p>Dr Bolling admits his study did not explore higher quantities than 12 ounces of yogurt a day (about 300 calories) because that is a little more than half the daily recommended serving of dairy in the US. </p><p>'I don't know why anyone would really want to eat more than that,' he said. </p><p>The study also did not identify which compounds in yogurt are responsible for the shift in biomarkers associated with the health-promoting effect or how they act in the body.</p><p>'The goal is to identify the components and then get human evidence to support their mechanism of action in the body,' he said. </p><p>'Ultimately, we would like to see these components optimised in foods, particularly for medical situations where it's important to inhibit inflammation through the diet.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • 
	Avoiding a midnight snack and early breakfast is the key to staying slim

    Avoiding a midnight snack and early breakfast is the key to staying slim

    key to staying slim, new research suggests.</p><p>Mice on a high-fat diet gain less weight when they are only able to eat for half the day, an Australian study found.</p><p>Previous research suggests late-night snacking is fueling the obesity crisis, with humans only supposed to eat between 8am and 8pm, or even earlier. </p><p>Yet, the researchers argue eating within any 12-hour window, whether during the day or at night, helps regulate signals that control people's appetites.</p><p>More than 25 per cent of adults in the UK are classified as obese. Carrying too much weight increases people's risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and even certain cancers.</p><p>Avoiding a midnight snack and early breakfast may be the key to staying slim (stock)</p><p>TV doctor Dr Michael Mosley has suggested the best time of day to eat carbohydrates.</p><p>He found eating pasta and bread at dinner is better for people's waistlines than toast in the morning.</p><p>Experts previously thought carbohydrates should largely be eaten at the start of the day as the body has longer to burn the glucose they release.</p><p>Failing to do this causes the release of insulin to bring blood sugar levels back to normal, which is done by storing excess sugar from carbs as fat, causing people to put on weight.</p><p>Yet, the new study, broadcast on the BBC's Trust Me I'm a Doctor, found eating carbohydrates in the evening causes less dramatic blood sugar spikes than carb-loading at breakfast, providing the rest of a person's food intake for that day has not been too starch-heavy.</p><p>Dr Mosley advises people are consistent with their carb-eating habits and avoid overindulging with every meal. </p><p>He carried out the research with the University of Surrey by asking healthy volunteers to eat either the majority of their daily carbohydrate intake in the morning or evening.</p><p>All of the study's participants ate the same amount of carbs every day, which included bread, pasta and vegetables.</p><p>For the first five days, they ate most of these foods for breakfast, followed by five days of eating a normal diet before finally switching to a low-carb breakfast, high-carb dinner for the last five days.</p><p>The researchers analysed the participants' blood sugar levels throughout the study. </p><p>Results suggest mice who have access to food for just half the day weigh less regardless of whether the nocturnal animals feed at night, which is their normal active period, or during the day, when they are naturally asleep.   </p><p>Such rodents are slimmer than those eating the same number of calories over an entire day. </p><p>This is thought to be due to them having more sensitive vagus nerves, which are responsible for communicating feelings of hunger to the brain.</p><p>Study author Professor Amanda Page, from the University of Adelaide, said: 'Time-restricted feeding did not affect weight gain in the standard laboratory diet mice but decreased weight gain in the high-fat diet mice - irrespective of the time-restricted diet period.'   </p><p>The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.</p><p>After eating, vagus nerves within the stomach wall send signals to the central nervous system to indicate whether people feel full.</p><p>Previous research suggests such nerves lose their sensitivity in obese people, which causes their stomachs to need to contain a lot more food before they feel full. </p><p>Targeting vagal nerves with drugs has been suggested as a potential treatment for obesity.</p><p>The researcher fed mice either a standard laboratory diet or a high-fat eating plan over 12 weeks.</p><p>Those following a high-fat diet either had access to such food across the entire day, or only during the light or dark phase.     </p><p>Vagal nerve recordings were taken at three-hour intervals.</p><p>Previous research suggests late-night snacking stops people being a healthy weight (stock)</p><p>This comes after research released last February suggested scientists may have uncovered why diets backfire.</p><p>Slimmers feel hungrier and have a stronger desire to eat up to two years after losing weight, a study found.</p><p>Among obese people who lose nearly 10 per cent of their body weight, their 'thermostats reset' to increase the impulse to eat, which the researchers believe may once have been an evolutionary advantage to protect against famine.</p><p>For people carrying too much weight, 'hunger hormones' may be harder to ignore as they become 'deaf' to signals that they are full, the scientists add.</p><p>The researchers, from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, wrote: 'Patients with severe obesity will, therefore, have to deal with increased hunger in the long term.' </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • 
	World Health Organisation vows to eliminate trans fats from diets globally

    World Health Organisation vows to eliminate trans fats from diets globally

    o help countries wipe out trans fats from the global food supply in the next five years.</p><p>The United Nations agency has in the past pushed to exterminate infectious diseases, but now it is aiming to erase a hazard linked to chronic illness.</p><p>The UN health agency said eliminating trans fats is critical to preventing deaths worldwide. </p><p>The WHO estimates that eating trans fats – commonly found in baked and processed foods – leads to the deaths of more than 500,000 people from heart disease every year.</p><p>The World Health Organisation called on all nations to eliminate artificial trans fats, which are common in fried and processed foods, from everything we eat in the next five years</p><p>Officials think it can be done in five years because the work is well under way in many countries. Denmark banned trans fats 15 years ago, and since then the United States and more than 40 other higher-income countries have been working on getting the heart-clogging additives out of their food supplies.</p><p>The WHO is now pushing middle- and lower-income countries to pick up the fight, said Dr Francesco Branca, director of the WHO's department of nutrition for health and development.</p><p>Artificial trans fats are unhealthy substances that are created when hydrogen is added to vegetable oil to make it solid, like in the creation of margarine or shortening. Health experts say they can be replaced with canola oil or other products. There are also naturally occurring trans fats in some meats and dairy products.</p><p>The WHO recommends that no more than 1% of a person's calories come from trans fats.</p><p>'Trans fats are a harmful compound that can be removed easily without major cost and without any impact on the quality of the foods,' Dr Branca said.</p><p>Countries will likely have to use regulation or legislation to compel food makers to make the switch, experts said.</p><p>Dr Tom Frieden, a former director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention who worked with WHO officials on the call to action, said the move was unprecedented.</p><p>'The world is now setting its sights on today's leading killers – particularly heart disease, which kills more people than any other cause in almost every country,' said Dr Frieden, president of a New-York-based project called Resolve to Save Lives.</p><p>The first trans fatty food to hit the US market was Crisco shortening, which went on sale in 1911. Trans fatty foods became increasingly popular beginning in the 1950s, partly because experts at the time thought they were healthier than cooking with butter or lard.</p><p>Food makers liked artificial trans fats because they prolonged product shelf life. They used them in doughnuts, biscuits and deep-fried foods.</p><p>But studies gradually revealed that trans fats wreck cholesterol levels in the blood and drive up the risk of heart disease. Health advocates say trans fats are the most harmful fat in the food supply.</p><p>In 2006, New York City banned restaurants from serving food with trans fats. The same year the FDA required manufacturers to list trans fat content information on food labels.</p><p>Many manufacturers cut back, and studies showed trans fat levels in the blood of middle-aged US adults fell by nearly 60% by the end of the decade.</p><p>In 2015, the US FDA took steps to finish the job of eliminating trans fats, calling for manufacturers to stop selling trans fatty foods by June 18, 2018 – a deadline that arrives next month. FDA officials have not said how much progress has been made or how they will enforce their rule against food makers that do not comply.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • 
	Dying Erika Zak pens letter to insurer that denied her a liver

    Dying Erika Zak pens letter to insurer that denied her a liver

    colon cancer and only a liver transplant will save the young mother's life. </p><p>The insurer called the surgery an 'unproven' treatment - despite a letter from Erika's doctors insisting that it was not only a valid course of action, but the only shot she would have at survival.  </p><p>Finally, her third and most scathing letter to UnitedHealthcare has changed the company's mind: Erika found out last week she will get a new liver and a chance at seeing her daughter grow up. </p><p>Scott Powers (left) and his wife Erika Zac (right) have been fighting to get her a liver transplant to save Erika's life from  the cancer she's been battling since their daughter, Loïe was born</p><p>Erika has had only a few healthy months with her daughter, Loïe. </p><p>Shortly after Loïe was born four years ago, Erika was diagnosed with stage 4 metastatic colon cancer. </p><p>Erika was only 34, fighting cancer for the second time in her life and suddenly unsure if she would even live to see her daughter's first birthday. </p><p>Tumors were surgically removed from her colon, and she began chemo treatments. </p><p>But disaster struck during microwave ablation surgery that targeted the cancer that had spread to Erika's liver. </p><p>The procedure is supposed to use heat to precisely attack the tumors but something went wrong and a hole was cut into Erika's already-damaged liver. Her bile ducts were ruined, too. </p><p>Now, due to the damage to her liver, she has developed dilated blood vessels that frequently bleed. In the last year, she has been in and our of the hospital with 19 stays. </p><p>Every sign of bleeding or fever is cause for panic in the Zak household. </p><p>Her doctors worry constantly that any infection will kill Erika. </p><p>Erika is beautiful, but you can see that she is sick. Her green eyes are ringed with yellow - jaundice, a common symptom of liver failure. </p><p>Bile drains into ostomy bags outside Erika's scarred abdomen. Most of her liver is already dead, and she has lost 20lbs in the last 12 months. </p><p>In a last ditch attempt to stop Erika's cancer last year, she was given an experimental immunotherapy, which worked wonders for her. </p><p>Every three weeks, Erika travels to the hospital her her home in Portland, Oregon for the treatment.  </p><p>She can survive the cancer, but her liver is only going to get worse. </p><p>All 100 physicians that have treated Erika have echoed the same thing: They don't know when, but without a new liver, she will die.   </p><p>For the first time in four years, Erika will have a fighting chance, if she can get the new liver. </p><p>She and her husband, Scott Powers, met with a Cleveland Clinic transplant team for evaluations in December and January. </p><p>Erika has been in the hospital 19 times in the last year due to complications of a surgery to remove tumors from her live that the 38-year-old mother had in 2014</p><p>At the beginning of February, she was given the go-ahead from the doctors. They put her on the waiting list for a liver. </p><p>The family's elation didn't last long. Their health insurance company declined to cover the transplant. </p><p>UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest insurance company, claimed that a liver transplant was not a 'promising' treatment for her condition. </p><p>Mircrowave ablation is a relatively new form of minimally invasive surgery. </p><p>It uses microwaves energy to destroy tumors by exposing them very high heat that is precisely targeted. </p><p>Surgeons insert a port into the patient near the site of the cancer, guiding the probe to the tumor</p><p>Ablation is faster, more precise and requires less recovery time than traditional surgery. </p><p>But if the ultrasound guidance used to help doctors target a tumor is off, if can easily blast other parts of an organ with heat, potentially destroying them.  </p><p>Despite her doctors' claims otherwise, the insurer said that her liver failure was due to toxicity from chemotherapy, suggesting that a transplant would not save her. </p><p>Erika was devastated. Feeling as though she had no hope for survival, she started researching Oregon's Death with Dignity program. </p><p>She wrote a sweet, gentle letter to say good bye to her daughter. But then she penned a very different one to the CEO of UnitedHealth.</p><p>Patients are typically on transplant wait lists for between 12 and 36 months and only 7,000 of the 20,000 Americans on that list are expected to get new livers this year. </p><p>Time was running out for Erika to fight, and the insurance company had already delayed her progress by two months. </p><p>In early April, Erika wrote yet another letter to UnitedHealtcare, this one even more scathing than the last. </p><p>She railed that their treatment of her case was 'shockingly incompetent,' and pleaded for her life. </p><p>Erika told CNN that she wrote to the company: 'Given that my life hangs in the balance based on this review.</p><p>'It is unconscionable that it has not been undertaken with the level of competence and professionalism anyone would expect of UHC.' </p><p>Erika was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer just three months after Loïe was born. Immunotherapy is keeping the cancer at bay, but without a new liver she will not survive </p><p>As she waited, for something to happen, Erika got sicker, developing a high and persistent fever. </p><p>Twice the insurance company set deadlines for when they would finish reevaluating her case. UnitedHealthcare missed both of them.  </p><p>Dr Andrew Cameron, head of transplant surgery at Johns Hopkins University told CNN that it is 'exceedingly rare' for insurance companies to decline to cover a liver transplant.  </p><p>But Erika's doctor at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr Federico Aucejo, is one of a very few surgeons who is trying to perform transplants on patients like Erica, who have difficult-to-treat metastasized tumors on their livers from colon cancer. </p><p>Outcomes for these kinds of procedures have historically been poor. During the 1980s and 1990s, less than 20 percent of these high risk liver transplant patients survived for more than five years after the operation. </p><p>But Dr Aucejo hopes to change that with a new approach.  </p><p>When UnitedHealthcare finally called Scott the news was the same as ever: They were still refusing to cover the operation. </p><p>'Honestly, you know that is messed up,' Scott told CNN he said to the representative that called him. </p><p>'I don't know who you've got to go to, but I would go to someone now and have someone call us, because this is so messed up,' he said. </p><p>Even the representative admitted to Scott that he was surprised by the denial, and did not entirely understand it. </p><p>Erika sat by while her husband was on the phone, trying to gather herself. Finally, she grabbed the phone from Scott. </p><p>Scott and Erika recently celebrated Loïe's fourth birthday, but Erika worried it would be the last she would spend with her little girl </p><p>'This is Erika, and you've never heard from me before. You don't know what we're going through. Because I'm dying,' she told CNN. </p><p>The representative told them Erika and Scott they could send still more information about her case - a familiar line. </p><p>In the course of their fight with the insurance company, the couple found out no one had ever even called Erika's oncologist in Oregon. </p><p>There was little reason to think they would listen now. </p><p>Yet, the following week, on May 7, Scott got another call from the insurer. UnitedHealthcare had changed its mind, inexplicably, and was agreeing to cover Erika's transplant. </p><p>They quickly spread the word to Erika's family, friends and doctors, and started packing. </p><p>Erika, Scott and Loïe are moving to Cleveland, so that as soon as there is a liver for her, there won't be another moment of delay for Erika. </p><p>Liver failure is ranked with a MELD score between six and 40. The closer to 40 a patient is, the more desperately in need of a liver they are and the higher priority they are given on the transplant list. </p><p>Erika's score is around 22. She may still have months of waiting, but she could also take a turn for the worse and quickly deteriorate. </p><p>Celebrating what she thought would be her last Mother's Day this weekend, Erika found herself crying, surrounded by her little girl and husband. </p><p>'I can't imagine not being here. It's not because I keep the family together or anything. It's just the love I have for them,' she told CNN. </p><p>Loïe asked her mother why she was crying and Erika replied, simply: 'I'm crying because I love you.'  </p><p>If Dr Aucejo's surgery is a success, Erika could have many more Mother's Days with her family.  </p><p>Because her case is 'new territory,' Dr Aucejo hopes that it will help to provide an example to insurance companies that patients like Erika can be saved and should get their best shot at survival as soon as possible. </p><p>'No one should have to fight and work that hard, especially when I have all these doctors saying it will save my life,' Erika told CNN. </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • Mind: How Abusive Relationships Take Root

    Mind: How Abusive Relationships Take Root

    author.</p><p>Roughly a third of women in developed countries report having been in at least one abusive relationship, defined by a partner or ex-partner who “causes physical, sexual or psychological harm, including physical aggression, sexual coercion, psychological abuse and controlling behaviors,” according to the World Health Organization.</p><p>The hallmark signs of the male abuser are well known to experts. He’s jealous. He exhibits a Jekyll-and-Hyde personality. He can be cruel with animals, to children. His instincts as the male in the relationship are traditionally cliché: overweening and dominant.</p><p>But often there are subtler, more incremental steps in the development of an abusive relationship, among men and women of all orientations.</p><p>“It often starts in a very insidious way,” said Patricia Pape, a psychologist in private practice in New York. “He says, ‘Don’t put Sweet-and-Low in your coffee, it’s poisonous.’</p><p>“Then, ‘When you wear that nail polish, it makes you look like a fallen woman,’ and ‘That skirt is too short, it’s too revealing.’ Or, ‘I don’t think you should see her, she’s not good for you.’</p><p>“You wind up in a situation where he’s telling you what to wear, what to eat, who you can see, how to behave.”</p><p>Each small adjustment made by the victim reinforces this control, Dr. Pape said.</p><p>One of her patients had a husband who, when the couple was out at a public event, would insist she not look around at the crowd, as he felt it could be seen as flirtatious. “It came to point that when she walked around, she would look down,” Dr. Pape said. “It changed how she walked.”</p><p>In this case, as in so many others, no single request was offensive on its own — at least, not early on. Each person in a relationship makes room for the other’s quirks, to some extent, male or female: that’s what couples do.</p><p>It’s the incremental ceding of control on one side that can prime someone for abuse, therapists said.</p><p>No one wants to be controlled, or managed, in this way. And certainly no one wants to admit to it.</p><p>“This is where embarrassment comes in,” said Elaine Ducharme, a psychologist in Glastonbury, Conn. “The shame of admitting it to friends — everyone is susceptible to that.”</p><p>Even as smaller confinements begin to lead to larger infringements, enough self-doubt has accumulated to feed the temptation to downplay the offense. It becomes increasingly difficult to see abuse for what it is.</p><p>“You remind yourself, ‘Well, he told me he loved me very much, he promises it will never happen again, he really does adore me,’” Dr. Ducharme said.</p><p>Another element often comes into play: the notion that the abuser can be reformed.</p><p>The decision to stay, for the time being, can seem more like a choice than it really is, Dr. Wathen said.</p><p>And there’s often the fear in anyone who is abused in any context — female and male, child and adult — that asking for help will somehow backfire. That no one will believe it all.</p><p>This fear crosses all levels of society. Fewer than 10 percent of all women who seek help for domestic violence also use shelters, research suggests. Women of means, in fact, are less likely than poorer women to do so.</p><p>None of which is to ignore the more explicit shackles an abusive relationship may impose: threats that if the victims tell others, or leave, there’ll be worse to come. These typically escalate when an abused partner tries to leave, or announces a decision to do so.</p><p>Jacquelyne Campbell of Johns Hopkins University has developed a checklist that predicts acts of violence, including murder, and features questions like: “Has he destroyed or threatened to destroy things that belong to you?” And: “Has he threatened to harm a child, a pet, an elderly family member?”</p><p>The abused partner is often forced to balance the risk to herself against the risk to loved ones. Leaving the relationship is rarely a matter of just walking away.</p><p>“Some guys are very slick, they know how to groom women, know how to manipulate them, they promise to help their career,” Dr. Pape said. “And no matter how bright she is — she freezes, and takes on all the shame, the responsibility for what’s happening.”</p><p>Women who can often leave and return multiple times. They sometimes flee in the middle of the night, grabbing the children and their wallet; they may end up at a friend’s home, or a sibling’s or parent’s, asking to stay for “a while,” according to an extensive review of focus group and interviews with abused women by researchers at the University of Western Ontario and elsewhere for forthcoming practice guidance for health and social service providers.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • I tried using a weighted blanket to stress less. Here's what happened.

    I tried using a weighted blanket to stress less. Here's what happened.

    t my thoughts weren’t racing as much either.</p><p>But is there really any concrete evidence to support my seemingly better sleep experience? Or was it all in my head?</p><p>The deep pressure of the blanket makes you feel like you’re being hugged or swaddled, says Zhdanova. “Being hugged is a very powerful stimulus,” she says. “When you’re hugged, you feel more secure.” Plus, weighted blankets offer mild restraint, says Zhdanova — they make it harder for you to move and thus harder for you to disturb yourself while you sleep.</p><p>Committed to shelling out some cash? Zhdanova recommends sticking with a weighted blanket on the lighter side. Most experts advise choosing one that’s roughly 10 percent of your body weight — so if you’re 150 pounds, you should buy a 15-pound blanket. Zhdanova notes that you shouldn’t use a weighted blanket if you snore or have sleep apnea, because anything that is placed on your chest can disrupt your breathing even further.</p><p>But if stress, a mile-long to-do list and funneling caffeine to get through the day is the battle you're fighting, a weighted blanket may just help you put those sleepless nights behind you.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • Young people are lonelier than older generations. Here's how parents can help.

    Young people are lonelier than older generations. Here's how parents can help.

    iencing a lack of connection,” says Douglas Nemecek, M.D., chief medical officer for Behavioral Health at Cigna.</p><p>Most alarming: Loneliness scores rose among the generations, with the youngest generation, Gen Z or the iGen, born between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s, scoring a 48.3 overall, as opposed to Millennials, who scored a 45.3., Gen X, who scored an also dismal 45.1 and Baby Boomers, who scored a 42.4. Those of grandparenting or great-grandparenting age, the Greatest Generation, were the least lonely, with a score of 38.6.</p><p>Sadly, it seems the younger you are, the lonelier you feel. “While we know that this is a group that’s coming of age and making life transitions, these findings give us a clear and surprising picture of how this generation perceives themselves,” says Nemecek. “It’s important that the communities these young people are a part of take note and explore solutions. It’s critical that they’re have spaces where young people can connect face-to-face to form meaningful relationships.”</p><p>Research has found that loneliness has the same impact on mortality as smoking 15 cigarettes a day, making it even more dangerous than obesity.</p><p>Parents can also help their teens by focusing on these healthy behaviors:</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • Woman whose baby died after lightning strike celebrates new pregnancy

    Woman whose baby died after lightning strike celebrates new pregnancy

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p> Meghan Davidson and her husband, Matt, said they weren't sure if she would be able to get pregnant again after her injuries. &nbsp;(WINK ) </p><p>A Florida woman who lost her newborn son two weeks after being struck by lightning while nine months pregnant with him has announced that she is expecting another baby. Meghan Davidson’s heart stopped beating after she was struck while out on a walk last June.</p><p>Owen was born on June 29, but he never opened his eyes. They decided to remove him from life support after two weeks, and he died within hours.</p><p>He added that they weren’t sure if she would be able to get pregnant again, and that they’ll never forget their son Owen.</p><p>She said she is due in October and that the couple’s faith and supportive community helped them overcome their tragedy.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • Salmonella outbreak in eggs sickens a dozen more people in five states

    Salmonella outbreak in eggs sickens a dozen more people in five states

    ckened by a salmonella outbreak that led to a recall of more than 200 million eggs last month.</p><p>The eggs are sold under different brands in a variety of retailers and restaurants, including Walmart and Waffle House.</p><p>Eleven people have been hospitalized, according to the CDC but no deaths have been reported from the outbreak, which prompted the recall of nearly 207 million eggs.</p><p>Rose Acre Farms did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Monday.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018

Comments

Earn free bitcoin