How much does it cost to run a patio heater?

Switch on summer: Eating outside in the summer can be one of life's great pleasures

Meanwhile, there is only a small time frame in Britain in which we can realistically sit out in an evening without shivering and calling it a night.

A good patio heater is not a bad bet for prolonging conservatory use throughout the year and to keep you out in the garden long after the sun has set.

But you are right to be concerned about what this could do to your energy usage. 

Anything that produces that kind of concentrated heat is bound to be expensive.

Let's take the 2000w - or 2kW - top level setting. 

This will cost roughly 31p an hour to run, based on the average UK tariff.

If you have this on in an evening for three hours, this would mean nearly £1 of usage. 

Using your example of 12 hours a week, it would cost £3.72.

Over the course of the year, this would equate to just shy of £200.

If you turn it down the middle setting of 1350w, this would cost more like 20p an hour. 

This would mean a slimmer £125 a year to run the heater - but might not be enough to keep you toasty.

This may not sound like an awful lot of money to some – but compared to a big appliance such as a fridge freezer, the amount of energy this will guzzle is huge.

Feeling hot, hot, hot: The price of running your infrared heater is high when you compare it to a fridge freezer

For example, a typical A-rated 180-litre fridge freezer costs roughly £40 a year to run while a bigger 500-litre fridge freezer with a higher A+ rating costs around £50 - and this is switched on 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. 

Furthermore, you might end up using the patio heater for longer than you expect and this could add a surprising amount onto your energy usage. 

Then again, if it helps prolong those summer evenings, perhaps it is a price worth paying.

As Cat Stevens sings, you really can: 'switch on summer from a slot machine'.

If you have been stuck with the same provider for some time, chances are you could shave hundreds off your energy bills.

Millions of households are sat on their provider's most expensive, out-of-contract deals. But switching to a better deal can instantly save you money.

According to This is Money and MailOnline's expert partner service, energyhelpline, one in ten families could cut their annual dual fuel bill by £537 a year by ditching an switching.

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April 16, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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  •  Asian shares drift lower as China data, trade cast shadows

    Asian shares drift lower as China data, trade cast shadows

    eek Friday as industrial and energy companies ticked higher. Corporate earnings from several major U.S. banks failed to excite investors, while consumer-focused companies like Amazon set record highs. The S&P 500 index edged up 0.1 percent to 2,801.31. The Dow Jones Industrial Average added 0.4 percent to 25,019.41. The Nasdaq composite set another record, just barely, as it ticked up 2.06 points to 7,825.98, and The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks fell 0.2 percent to 1,687.08.</p><p> CHINA ECONOMY GROWS: China's economic growth slowed in the quarter ending in June, adding to challenges for Beijing amid a mounting tariff battle with Washington. The world's second-largest economy expanded by 6.7 percent, down from the previous quarter's 6.8 percent, the government reported Monday. Even before the dispute with Washington erupted, forecasters expected growth to cool after Beijing started tightening controls on bank lending last year to rein in surging debt.</p><p> ANALYST VIEWPOINT: "The upshot is that the statistics bureau is now starting to more publicly acknowledge that the economy is losing steam. This should make it easier for officials to justify shifting to a more supportive policy stance," Julian Evans-Pritchard of Capital Economics said in a commentary. "The People's Bank has already been nudging down market interest rates since the beginning of the year but is likely to take the more high-profile step of cutting benchmark lending rates in the coming months."</p><p> EU-CHINA TRADE: European Council President Donald Tusk, while on a visit to Beijing, urged President Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin and China to work with Europe to avoid trade wars and prevent conflict and chaos. Tusk was speaking at the opening of a summit between China and the European Union, just hours ahead of a summit between Trump and Putin in Helsinki. Tusk said Europe, China, the U.S. and Russia had a "common duty" not to destroy the global order but to improve it by reforming international trade rules.</p><p> CURRENCY: The dollar rose to 112.47 yen from 112.39 yen late Friday while the euro edged lower to $1.1684 from $1.1688.</p><p> ENERGY: Benchmark U.S. crude rose fell 36 cents to $70.65 per barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It rose 1 percent on Friday to $71.01 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, used to price international oils, lost 40 cents to $74.93 per barrel.</p>

    1 July 16, 2018
  •  EU official urges Trump, Putin not to destroy global order

    EU official urges Trump, Putin not to destroy global order

    eijing at the opening of a summit between China and the European Union, just hours ahead of a summit between Trump and Putin in Helsinki.</p><p> "We are all aware of the fact that the architecture of the world is changing before our very eyes and it is our common responsibility to make it a change for the better," Tusk said.</p><p> Last week, Tusk lambasted Trump's constant criticism of European allies and urged him to remember who his friends are when he meets Putin. In Beijing, Tusk said that Europe, China, the U.S. and Russia had a "common duty" not to destroy the global order but to improve it by reforming international trade rules.</p><p> "This is why I am calling on our Chinese hosts, but also on presidents Trump and Putin, to jointly start this process from a thorough reform of the WTO," Tusk earlier said, referring to the World Trade Organization by its acronym. "There is still time to prevent conflict and chaos."</p><p> Washington imposed 25 percent tariffs on $34 billion of goods in response to complaints that Beijing is hurting American companies by stealing or pressuring enterprises to hand over technology. It has also applied tariffs on imported steel and aluminum from allies like Canada, Mexico and the European Union. The 28-country EU bloc has responded with import taxes on $3.25 billion of U.S. goods.</p><p> Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said Monday that China and the EU had agreed to take steps to "safeguard free trade" and the global multilateral regulatory system. He endorsed efforts to update World Trade Organization rules that Washington complains are outdated and cumbersome.</p><p> Asked whether China used Monday's meeting to try to form an alliance with the EU against Washington, Li said the U.S.-Chinese dispute was a bilateral matter for Beijing and Washington to solve.</p><p> "Our summit is not directed at any third country," said Li at a joint news conference.</p><p> Chinese leaders have tried without success to recruit German, France and other governments as allies against Washington.</p><p> "We see a China that is seeking alliances as countermeasures to the U.S. actions," the president of the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China, Mats Harborn, said last week.</p><p> European leaders criticize President Donald Trump's tactics but share U.S. complaints about Chinese industrial policies and trade barriers.</p><p> A European Union report last month said Beijing had imposed more new import and investment barriers in 2017 than any other government. The 28-nation EU is China's second-biggest trading partner after the United States.</p><p> The EU cited "rising obstacles" in China's semiconductor, cybersecurity and other industries.</p><p> "Protectionism is on the rise," the report said. "China was identified as the partner contributing the most to this trend."</p><p> Li has tried appeal to visiting European leaders including German Chancellor Angela Merkel in May by saying their companies were welcome to invest.</p><p> The premier gave no indication whether Beijing would act on complaints European companies are blocked from acquiring most Chinese assets while its companies operate freely abroad.</p><p> During a visit to Berlin by Li this month, German and Chinese companies signed deals worth 20 billion euros ($24 billion).</p>

    1 July 16, 2018

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