A Mediterranean diet may boost the health of the liver

A Mediterranean diet is not just good for the heart - it may also boost the health of the liver, a study suggests.

Adopting the diet, loaded with fruit and veg, whole grains, olive oil and fish, lowers the risk of hospitalisation in patients with cirrhosis. 

The deadly condition, scarring of the liver caused by long-term damage, kills one million people across the world each year, figures show.

There is currently no cure and treatment revolves around slowing its progression, before it leads to the need for a liver transplant or even kills.

Adopting the diet, loaded with fruit and veg, whole grains, olive oil and fish, lowers the risk of hospitalisation in patients with cirrhosis

But the new research, out of Virginia Commonwealth University, suggests following a Mediterranean diet could boost the outcome of cirrhosis patients. 

The trial, branded 'important', adds to the growing body of evidence that shows the benefits of the healthy diet. 

Scientists found the diet, which contains only a small amount of red meat, improves the gut microbial diversity of cirrhosis patients. 

The discovery, derived from nearly 300 adults, adds to a growing body of evidence that highlights a diverse microbiome can halt of the condition. 

Some 157 Americans and 139 Turkish adults took part in the study. They were either healthy, or had a form of cirrhosis. 

The volunteers had their dietary habits analysed and a sample of stool tested to assess how diverse their gut microbiota was.

Previous research by the Maastricht University in the Netherlands found that adopting a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of developing the most deadly form of breast cancer by 40 per cent.

Experts from the University of Barcelona also believe the range of nutrients in the diet makes children less likely to have ADHD.

Cambridge University even found that adopting such a diet would save around 2,000 lives in Britain a year by preventing deaths from heart attacks and stroke.

Researchers from the IRCCS Neuromed Institute in Pozzilli, Italy, even suggest doctors prescribe olive oil, vegetables and nuts before statins to reduce a patient's heart attack risk. 

Scientists followed the patients for three months to assess the risk of hositalizations, caused by complications such as jaundice and gallstones.  

Researchers, led by Dr Jasmohan Bajaj, uncovered a striking difference between the gut microbiota of the Turkish and American adults. 

The US population tended to follow a Western diet, while the Turkish cohort often consumed a Mediterranean-style diet.

An analysis of stool samples revealed the Turkish participants had a significantly greater diversity in their gut microbiota.

However, the researchers discovered there was a significantly higher number of hospitalisations in the US population.

Dr Bajaj said: 'It is the first study to confirm a link between diet, microbial diversity and clinical outcomes in liver cirrhosis.' 

The findings were presented at the International Liver Congress in Paris last week.

Professor Annalisa Berzigotta, a board member of The European Association for the Study of the Liver, described the study as 'important'.

She said: [It] adds to the existing evidence indicating a robust, pleiotropic beneficial effect of following a "Mediterranean-style diet" on human health.'

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April 16, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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	Widow whose husband died of ALS and Lyme disease pens account

    Widow whose husband died of ALS and Lyme disease pens account

    ied after a battle with both Lyme disease and ALS.</p><p>Jo Ann Simon, 64, from Bethel, Connecticut, said the first sign that something was wrong with her husband Tom was when he began speaking with a lisp in 2011. </p><p>Then his speech began slurring and he had trouble moving his hands. He was diagnosed in June 2012 with Lyme disease and, just a month later, with Lou Gehrig's disease.</p><p>Some lead long lives after receiving the terminal diagnosis, such as former NFL player Steve Gleason who has been living with the disease for seven years, and physicist Stephen Hawking who battled it for 56 years.</p><p>For others, it's a rapid and cruel degeneration. Jo Ann watched Tom become confined to a wheelchair, drink only liquids because he was unable to chew, and lose the ability to speak and have to communicate with a text-to-talk app.</p><p>In May 2014, at age 55, he lost his fight to the neurodegenerative disease.</p><p>Speaking to Daily Mail Online, Jo Ann shares the agony of watching Tom's disease rob him of all his motor skills, and how she refused to accept that his diagnosis was a fatal one.</p><p>Jo Ann Simon, 64, from Bethel, Connecticut, has opened up about what it was like to watch her husband Tom suffer through his battle with ALS and Lyme disease. Pictured: Jo Ann and Tom</p><p>The couple was visiting Block Island off of Rhode Island in July 2011 when Tom was bitten by a tick. Months later, he began speaking with lisp and had trouble moving his hands. He was diagnosed in June 2012 with Lyme disease in July 2012 with ALS. Pictured: Jo Ann and Tom before, left, and after his diagnosis</p><p>Jo Ann met Tom at Greenwood's Grille &amp; Ale House in Bethel, Connecticut in 2004, where he walked over to the table where Jo Ann was sitting with her friend, Debbie to introduce himself.</p><p>'I was newly divorced, I was done with men and I didn't think he was my type,' Jo Ann said.</p><p>'Debbie suggested that he join us and I almost kicked her under the table like: "What are you doing?"'  </p><p>After chatting, Tom told Jo Ann he would love to take her to dinner sometime, but Jo Ann told him that she didn't have a card with her number to give him - so Debbie gave him one. </p><p>Jo Ann didn't hear from Tom for three to four weeks until she was having dinner again at Greenwood's.</p><p>Tom was also there, and he told her he had accidentally put the pair of pants containing her card in the washing machine, disintegrating it, with no way to reach her.</p><p>'We became best friends, then fell in love,' Jo Ann said.</p><p>ALS is a neurodegenerative disease in which sufferers eventually lose the ability to walk, talk, dress, write and breathe. In August 2013, Tom's doctors put him on IVIG, a treatment made from donated blood that contains healthy antibodies to block any harmful ones from doing damage. Pictured: Tom and Jo Ann before the diagnosis</p><p>Jo Ann said at first the treatment worked, but them his symptoms worsened. He became wheelchair-bound and his speech became so close to nonexistent that the couple began using a text-to-talk app so they could communicate. Pictured: Jo Ann and Tom before the diagnosis with one of their grandchildren</p><p>Jo Ann and Tom were vacationing on Block Island off the coast of Rhode Island in July 2011, having recently gotten married, when he bitten by a tick. </p><p>No signs manifested until months later when Jo Ann noticed Tom's 'prolific voice' was fading and he had begun speaking with a lisp.</p><p>He went to the doctor in June 2012 and he was diagnosed with Lyme disease.</p><p>Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that generally causes a rash as well as joint-pain and muscle weakness.</p><p>Tom was put on antibiotics, but his symptoms didn't improve. His lisp grew worse, his speech got worse and he had trouble moving fingers.</p><p>A month later, his doctor recommended he go see a neurologist. After assessing Tom's symptoms and running a few tests, he said he believed Tom had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as ALS.</p><p>ALS is neurodegenerative disease, which progressively damages nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.</p><p>ALS is an acronym for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.</p><p>It is also referred to as motor neurone disease, or Lou Gehrig's disease after the US baseball player when he was diagnosed in 1939 at just 36 years old.</p><p>The disease is a rare condition that progressively damages parts of the nervous system.</p><p>It occurs when specialist nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord called motor neurones stop working properly - known as neurodegeneration.</p><p>Life expectancy for about half of those with the condition is three years from the start of symptoms.</p><p>However, some people may live for up to 10 years, and in rarer circumstances even longer.</p><p>The condition can affect adults of all ages, including teenagers, although this is extremely rare.</p><p>It's usually diagnosed in people over 40, but most people with the condition first develop symptoms in their 60s. It affects slightly more men than women.</p><p>There's currently no cure for motor neurone disease.</p><p>Treatment aims to make the person feel comfortable and have the best quality of life possible</p><p>It also tries to compensate for the progressive loss of bodily functions such as mobility, communication, swallowing and breathing. </p><p>It also goes by the names of motor neuron disease or Lou Gehrig's disease after the New York Yankees player who was diagnosed in 1939. </p><p>Over time, sufferers lose the ability to walk, talk, dress, chew, write and breathe.</p><p>The average life expectancy from the time of diagnosis averages between two and five years. </p><p>'I said: "This can't be true. It's impossible. We have to figure out what's wrong and fix it",' Jo Ann said.</p><p>After multiple treatments showed no improvement, Tom's doctors put him on Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy (IVIG) in August 2013.</p><p>IVIG is a treatment made from donated blood that contains healthy antibodies to block any harmful ones from doing damage. </p><p>'At first the IVIG was helping. Before he would be on it he'd be sitting in a wheelchair but, after it, he felt like he could dance,' Jo Ann said.  </p><p>Tom's speech became so close to nonexistent that the couple began using a text-to-talk app to communicate. </p><p>The once boisterous chef who ate a lot dropped significantly in weight.</p><p>'His eating changed from whole foods to ground up foods to foods with no lactose to just liquids because he was unable to chew,' Jo Ann said.</p><p>Tom, the big teddy bear who stood at six feet tall and was once a football player, lost 100 pounds by the end of his life - from 251 pounds down to 151.</p><p>'His mind was still there, he was still keen but he had trouble communicating,' Jo Ann said. 'He lost hope a lot sooner than I did.'</p><p>Tom's balance started to falter and he would be out of breath walking from the living room to the kitchen. The six-foot-tall chef (left and right) lost 100 pounds by the end of his life - from 251 pounds down to 151</p><p>After the IVIG treatment ended, the couple enrolled Tom into stem cell therapy treatment but Jo Ann said it was too late because, by then, his symptoms were far too progressed. Pictured: Jo Ann and Tom (far left and second from left) with friends on the Block Island Ferry</p><p>After the IVIG treatment ended in April 2014, the couple enrolled Tom into stem cell therapy treatment but Jo Ann said it was too late because, by then, his symptoms were far too progressed.  </p><p>That same month, Tom had a night during which he was having severe difficulty breathing but didn't want to go the hospital. The next day, after seeing no improvement, Jo Ann called an ambulance.</p><p>'When we got to the hospital, I gave them a rundown of his condition,' Jo Ann said.</p><p>In April 2014, Tom had severe difficulty breathing one night so he was rushed to the hospital. Pictured: Tom and Jo Ann</p><p>'They told me that he was having a heart attack so I had to approve him for emergency surgery.'</p><p>As it turned out Tom was not suffering from a heart attack but from tachycardia, or rapid heart rate, and did not need the surgery after all. </p><p>Throughout his 14-day stay at the hospital, Jo Ann said Tom's condition was the worst it had ever been.  </p><p>'I could tell he was getting worse. We had the stylus for the talk-to-text app but he couldn't even hold the stylus anymore,' she said.</p><p>'So we got a letter board and he would point to the letters on the board to talk to me. Halfway through his stay at hospital, he could not do that anymore.'</p><p>Knowing Tom was likely nearing the end of his life, Jo Ann arranged for in-home hospice care. </p><p>Jo Ann took Tom home on Mother's Day and he passed five days later at age 55. </p><p>'We were together for 10 years and married for three years. He was the love of my life,' Jo Ann said.</p><p>'And I was facing grief but I didn't want to forget anything. I knew as time would go forward, I would forget the little things.'</p><p>Jo Ann brought Tom home from the hospital in May. He spent five days in in-home hospice care before he passed away. Pictured: Jo Ann and Tom on Halloween</p><p>Dealing with grief but not wanting to forget the memories of their life together, Jo Ann wrote Rose-Colored Glasses: A Memoir of Love, Loss and Hope, which she hopes reminds people to be positive and 'to make most out of every single day'. Pictured: Jo Ann and Tom</p><p>Over Labor Day weekend of that year, Jo Ann was on Block Island 'where it all started' and said her memory was rejigged of her and Tom first meeting and falling in love.</p><p>'That's where I got the inspiration to write the book. I thought that people were probably going through the same or similar things and I thought maybe it could help them,' she said.</p><p>And so Jo Ann penned Rose-Colored Glasses: A Memoir of Love, Loss and Hope, which was released this year.</p><p>'The book discusses my life Before Tom and After Tom and figuring how I was going to go forward and live my life after him,' she said. </p><p>'[The diagnosis] broke my heart. I think I on purpose didn't see the changes. All had to do was look in his eyes and know what he was there.'</p><p>She said she hopes the message people draw from her book is to be positive and to cherish the time with their loved ones.</p><p>'I want people to remember to be positive and to the make most out of every single day,' Jo Ann said.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	Asthma drug is a 'beacon of hope' for thousands of people with a severe form of the disease

    Asthma drug is a 'beacon of hope' for thousands of people with a severe form of the disease

    pe' for people with the lung disease, a charity has said.</p><p>The drug, benralizumab, is used alongside other asthma medication to reduce the risk of asthma attacks, and was approved in the US in November last year.</p><p>It is given as an injection once every four weeks for the first three months and then once every eight weeks.</p><p>At its full market price the drug would cost almost £12,000 per patient per year after their first year – six bimonthly doses at £1,995 each – but the NHS may pay less.</p><p>Asthma UK says the medication has the potential to transform the lives of around 100,000 people who have severe asthma which does not respond to treatment. </p><p>People with eosinophilic asthma may find it does not respond to treatment with inhalers or steroids, according to Asthma UK</p><p>Around 5.4 million people in the UK and 25 million Americans have asthma, and some 100,000 Brits have eosinophilic asthma, according to the charity Asthma UK.</p><p>People with eosinophilic asthma, at which the new drug is targeted, have more white blood cells in their lungs which makes asthma attacks and breathing problems worse.</p><p>It is often not improved by traditional asthma treatments such as inhalers and steroids so can be harder to manage.</p><p>Asthma is a common but incurable condition which affects the small tubes inside the lungs.</p><p>It can cause them to become inflamed, or swollen, which restricts the airways and makes it harder to breathe.</p><p>The condition affects people of all ages and often starts in childhood. Symptoms may improve or even go away as children grow older, but can return in adulthood.</p><p>Symptoms include wheezing, breathlessness, a tight chest and coughing, and these may get worse during an asthma attack.</p><p>Treatment usually involves medication which is inhaled to calm down the lungs.</p><p>Triggers for the condition include allergies, dust, air pollution, exercise and infections such as cold or flu.</p><p>If you think you or your child has asthma you should visit a doctor, because it can develop into more serious complications like fatigue or lung infections.</p><p>Benralizumab works by stopping the body from producing so many white blood cells in the lungs, which reduces how severe asthmatic reactions are.</p><p>Asthma UK's chief executive, Kay Boycott said: 'This new drug Benralizumab offers a beacon of hope to thousands of people in the UK who have an acute form of asthma called severe eosinophilic asthma.</p><p>'This debilitating form of asthma is resistant to regular treatments such as inhalers and steroids, meaning many people are left dealing with terrifying asthma symptoms such as gasping for breath, or repeated trips to A&amp;E.</p><p>'This drug has the potential to transform the quality of lives of many. NHS England now must ensure this treatment becomes readily available to those who need it.'</p><p>Benralizumab costs £1,955 per injection – nearly £14,000 per person for their first year – but the NHS is believed to have negotiated a lower price.</p><p>The announcement comes just months after public health data showed deaths from asthma in the UK have risen by a quarter in the past five years.   </p><p>The number of Britons who suffered a fatal asthma attack increased by 24.6 per cent from 1,151 in 2011 to 1,434 in 2015.  </p><p>And this rate is 50 per cent higher than the European average, and more than three times higher than the Dutch figure. </p><p>In May experts blamed complacency among both medical staff and patients in the routine care of the condition, prevention and during attacks.   </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	Boys should be given life-saving HPV vaccine, say Government advisers

    Boys should be given life-saving HPV vaccine, say Government advisers

    life-saving vaccine that is currently only administered to girls, an advisory committee says.</p><p>But today the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation changed its stance, and recommended they are given the jab alongside girls.</p><p>Girls have been prioritised because HPV causes cervical cancer, which kills about 1,000 women a year. Around 500 women die from other HPV-related cancers a year. </p><p>But it is now known to cause some 2,000 male cancers annually, resulting in the deaths of about 650 men a year, mainly from mouth and throat forms of the disease.</p><p>Charities today hailed the 'huge triumph' and begged the Department of Health and Social Care to immediately implement the guidance.  Officials told MailOnline the final decision, also awaited on by ministers in Scotland and Wales, could be expected anytime in the next three weeks.</p><p>Health Minister Steve Brine said he is 'looking at the advice carefully', adding the DHSC would announce its decision 'very soon'. </p><p>The move could bring the UK in line with 20 other countries, including Australia and the US, who gave the green light to boys getting the HPV jab nearly a decade ago.</p><p>HPV is the most common STI in the US and the UK with an estimated 14 million Americans infected every year, and a third of British adults.</p><p>Government advisers have for years denied boys the inoculation against the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV) on the NHS</p><p>Tristan Almada, founder of the NOMAN is an Island: Race to End HPV campaign, said the decision is 'the biggest opportunity to prevent cancer in decades'.</p><p>She added: 'The news that the JCVI recommends the vaccination of boys alongside girls against HPV is a huge triumph in the fight against cancer.</p><p>'We implore the DHSC to take the steps to include boys in the national HPV vaccination programme as soon as possible.'</p><p>HPV Action campaign director Peter Baker said: ‘The JCVI’s advice that boys should be vaccinated is very welcome news for boys and their parents. </p><p>'It will also benefit those girls who for whatever reason have not been vaccinated against HPV. </p><p>'We have waited a very long time for this announcement and it is now imperative that ministers accept the JCVI’s advice without delay so that no more boys left at risk.' </p><p>HPV Action believes it is 'entirely realistic' for the vaccination of boys to begin by September 2019 at the latest.</p><p>Since 2008 the vaccine against the sexually transmitted virus has been given to 12-13-year-old girls on the NHS – but, controversially, not to boys.</p><p>In the US, the CDC recommends for all children to receive the vaccine, which was approved by the FDA in 2010, between the ages of nine and 12. Catch-up jabs are then available for men up to the age of 21 and women up to 26.</p><p>It's estimated that about 400 lives could be saved every year in the UK as a result of vaccinating girls - while around 30,000 cases of cancer could be avoided in the US each year with the jab, according to figures. </p><p>However, a wave of allegations over the controversial HPV jab has caused vaccine rates to plummet to as low as 1 per cent in some countries.</p><p>Anti-vaccine campaigners have the slump, which has badly affected Japan, which had a vaccine rate of 70 per cent just four years ago. </p><p>They have posted hundreds of unsourced videos online featuring girls in wheelchairs that they claim have been disabled by the jab.  </p><p>The downturn in vaccination rates came after an allegedly fake study on mice linked the vaccine to neurological issues.</p><p>A wave of allegations over the controversial HPV jab has caused vaccine rates to plummet to as low as 1 per cent in some countries</p><p>However, the world's leading health officials have repeatedly slammed anti-vaxxers for 'promoting pseudoscience'.</p><p>Government authorities agree there is no evidence to support a link between HPV vaccination and chronic illnesses.</p><p>The World Health Organisation, CDC, Public Health England and the European Medicines Regulator have 'extensively reviewed the vaccine's safety'.</p><p>They concluded there is 'no credible evidence of a link between the HPV vaccine and a range of chronic illnesses'. </p><p>They warn the vaccine has been proven to be safe in more than 10 years of studies, and it is essential for preventing dozens of HPV-linked cancers.</p><p>And last year, the revered John Maddox prize for 'sense about science' was awarded to a Japanese researcher who debunked the jab claims. </p><p>English health officials received 3,972 'yellow cards' - warnings of side effects - between 2010 and 2013 for the controversial HPV jab Gardasil.</p><p>In Europe, 11,867 reactions to Gardasil have been recorded up to February 2017, according to The European Medicines Agency.</p><p>Extending the programme will directly protect some 400,000 teenage boys a year from harbouring the virus for life, experts believe.</p><p>Currently the only way to get boys vaccinated is to go private, costing about £300 for a course. About 370,000 Year 8 girls receive Gardasil jabs annually, but not their 390,000 male classmates.</p><p>The decision to recommend 12-13 year-old boys also get the HPV jab is a victory for The Mail On Sunday, which has long campaigned for the move.  </p><p>The JCVI had previously concluded it was 'overwhelmingly' unlikely that vaccinating boys would be cost-effective.</p><p>Its conclusions were based, in part, on a flawed computer model that wrongly assumed HPV caused relatively few cancers in men. </p><p>The body also reasoned the vast majority of young men would be protected as a result of vaccinating girls.</p><p>But earlier this month the committee accepted new evidence that HPV causes many more cancers in men than previously thought. </p><p>In particular, it causes up to five times as many mouth and throat cancers as had been estimated.</p><p>The British Association for Sexual Health and HIV described the move as a 'fantastic achievement' for those who have been tirelessly campaigning</p><p>And The Royal Society for Public Health tweeted that the move is a 'victory for public health and health equality'</p><p>The Terrence Higgins Trust‏ warned it is 'not a done deal' and called on the DHSC to take 'urgent action' to extend the programme</p><p>At a meeting in June, the JCVI subsequently switched its advice to conclude that vaccinating boys may well be cost-effective, the Mail On Sunday learned.</p><p>The advice was made public today, although it was passed to Ministers at the time.</p><p>However, Health Department sources last night said that as soon as the advice is published, the extension of vaccination to year 8 boys will be announced. </p><p>A spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Social Care stressed last month it would 'carefully consider' the advice once received.</p><p>The move is likely to cost about £22 million a year but the NHS should eventually save money as it will need to treat far fewer men for HPV cancers.</p><p>In the short term, it will also save it from not having to treat as many cases of genital warts, which the jab also protects against. </p><p>The British Association for Sexual Health and HIV described the move as a 'fantastic achievement' for those who have been tirelessly campaigning.</p><p>And The Royal Society for Public Health tweeted that the move is a 'victory for public health and health equality'.</p><p>The Terrence Higgins Trust‏ warned it is 'not a done deal' and called on the DHSC to take 'urgent action' to extend the programme. </p><p>Up to eight out of 10 people will be infected with HPV in their lives</p><p>Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name for a group of viruses that affect your skin and the moist membranes lining your body. </p><p>Spread through vaginal, anal and oral sex and skin-to-skin contact between genitals, it is extremely common. </p><p>Up to eight out of 10 people will be infected with the virus at some point in their lives.</p><p>There are more than 100 types of HPV. Around 30 of which can affect the genital area. Genital HPV infections are common and highly contagious.</p><p>Many people never show symptoms, as they can arise years after infection, and the majority of cases go away without treatment.</p><p>It can lead to genital warts, and is also known to cause cervical cancer by creating an abnormal tissue growth.</p><p>Annually, an average of 38,000 cases of HPV-related cancers are diagnosed in the US, 3,100 cases of cervical cancer in the UK and around 2,000 other cancers in men.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	A few beers a week could help men start a family

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    f wine may actually help men start a family.</p><p>Italian researchers who asked 323 men about their alcohol consumption found moderate drinkers had a better sperm count. </p><p>This worked out as up to a bottle and small glass of wine a week, or seven small bottles of beer.</p><p>A study suggests a few small beers a week or bottle of wine may actually help men start a family</p><p>The study, led by the Fondazione Policlinico in Milan, suggests the antioxidants from grapes in wine, and a compound in beer hops called Xanthohumol, may slightly improve sperm by protecting cells from damage.</p><p>Dr Elena Ricci, who led the research, said: 'We found that men who consumed four to seven units per week had higher semen volume and total sperm count than those who drank less or more than that. We concluded that moderate alcohol intake appears positively associated to semen quality, in this group of men.</p><p>'But the association between alcohol intake and male reproductive function is still controversial and several studies have shown that heavy drinking is linked to detrimental effects.'</p><p>Italian researchers who asked 323 men about their alcohol consumption found moderate drinkers had a better sperm count</p><p>Alcohol units are calculated differently in Italy than the UK, with one unit representing 12.5 grams of alcohol instead of the eight grams we use.</p><p>Researchers classed moderate drinkers as men who consumed four to seven units of alcohol a week, which ranges from two-thirds of a bottle of wine to a bottle and a single small glass.</p><p>For beer drinkers, it works out as four to seven 330ml bottles of beer.</p><p>The results show that, compared to men drinking zero to three units of alcohol a week, the moderate drinkers had a higher overall sperm count. Their sperm was less concentrated, but they produced more semen, meaning a higher chance of getting their partner pregnant, according to the authors. </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
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	Processed meats may increase the risk of manic personality episodes

    Processed meats may increase the risk of manic personality episodes

    g a manic episode.</p><p>A study of more than 1,000 people, including those with psychiatric disorders, found people who had consumed processed meat were three and a half times more likely to have been hospitalised for mania.</p><p>Eating processed meat could raise someone's risk of having a manic episode</p><p>Researchers at Johns Hopkins University asked people if they had ever eaten dry, cured meats. </p><p>While salami and prosciutto were not linked to mania, cured 'meat sticks' were linked to an increased chance of hospitalisation.</p><p>They say nitrates, used as meat preservatives, may affect the brains and gut bacteria of people who eat them. Nitric oxide is found in higher levels within the blood of people with bipolar disorder.</p><p>Lead author Dr Robert Yolken, from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said: 'Future work on this association could lead to dietary interventions to help reduce the risk of manic episodes in those who have bipolar disorder or who are otherwise vulnerable to mania.' </p><p>Processed meat is also known to increase people's risk of bowel cancer (stock image) </p><p>To test the effects of nitrates, the US researchers added them to the diet of rats, which showed signs of mania after just a few weeks.</p><p>In the human study, people were asked if they had eaten meat sticks in the form of turkey and beef jerky, 'meat sticks', prosciutto and salami. </p><p>Meat sticks and jerky are popular snacks in the US, and less so in the UK, however nitrates are used here as preservatives for a minority of sausages and may also be in bacon and burgers.</p><p>The study, published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, found nitrates changed the gut bacteria of rats, which may be linked to mental health problems. It follows evidence that giving people with bipolar disorder probiotics, to alter their gut bugs, makes them less likely to be rehospitalised.</p><p>Processed meat is also known to increase people's risk of bowel cancer.</p><p>Dr Yolken said: 'We looked at a number of different dietary exposures and cured meat really stood out. It wasn't just that people with mania have an abnormal diet.'</p><p>Seva Khambadkone, a co-author who worked on the rat experiment, added: 'It's clear that mania is a complex neuropsychiatric state, and that both genetic vulnerabilities and environmental factors are likely involved in the emergence and severity of bipolar disorder and associated manic episodes.</p><p>'Our results suggest that nitrated cured meat could be one environmental player in mediating mania.' </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	Eating dinner before 9pm could cut the risk of developing cancer

    Eating dinner before 9pm could cut the risk of developing cancer

    going to bed reduces the chances of getting both cancers, a study of more than 4,000 people suggests.</p><p>Experts believe eating late at night causes inflammation in the body and alters blood sugar levels, both linked to cancer.</p><p>Evolutionarily, humans are hard-wired to eat when it is light and digest food before going to sleep in the darkness. But modern life, with late working hours and long commuting times, means many people have got into the habit of eating late. </p><p>Eating dinner before 9pm could cut people’s risk of breast and prostate cancer by a fifth</p><p>Researchers led by Barcelona Institute for Global Health found eating before 9pm, compared to having an evening meal after 10pm, cuts the risk of prostate cancer in men and breast cancer in women by an average 18 per cent.</p><p>Leaving more than two hours between dinner and bedtime, compared to sleeping soon after eating, slashes the odds of both cancers by an average of 20 per cent.</p><p>Dr Manolis Kogevinas, who led the study, said: ‘People already know that if they eat late and go to bed soon afterwards that they will not metabolise their food and won’t get a good night’s sleep. </p><p>'We don’t need a study to tell us that, but this study suggests that eating times, like sleep, have longer-term effects for breast and prostate cancer. The impact could be especially important in cultures such as those of southern Europe, where people have supper late.’</p><p>There is evidence that people who disrupt sleeping patterns by working night shifts, are at greater risk of prostate and breast cancer, although not all studies agree.</p><p>Researchers led by Barcelona Institute for Global Health found eating before 9pm, compared to having an evening meal after 10pm, cuts the risk of prostate cancer in men and breast cancer in women by an average 18 per cent</p><p>Now experts believe changes to other daily patterns, such as mealtimes, could also upset the body’s natural function. The Spanish researchers asked more than 1,800 people with prostate and breast cancer, and more than 2,000 healthy people about the timings of their meals and sleeping habits. The results show those eating before 9pm, compared to after 10pm, were 25 per cent less likely to have prostate cancer and 15 per cent less likely to have breast cancer.</p><p>People who ate more than two hours before going to bed were 26 per cent less likely to have prostate cancer and 16 per cent less likely to have breast cancer.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	Mother, 34, who woke up unable to move as a teenager waited years to be diagnosed with MS

    Mother, 34, who woke up unable to move as a teenager waited years to be diagnosed with MS

    at the age of 17, she woke up one morning unable to move.  </p><p>This began a search for answers which took more than ten years during which she was called a hypochondriac because medics could not figure out the problem.</p><p>But after a relapse when she was pregnant with her youngest daughter Nava in 2016, Ms Elias had her MS diagnosis confirmed.</p><p>During relapses the condition can leave her exhausted, struggling to balance, with numbness in her legs and periods of temporary paralysis.</p><p>Ms Elias is now trying to raise £50,000 for a pioneering stem cell treatment and chemotherapy in Russia which she says could help her body to 'forget' the MS.</p><p>Fiona Elias, pictured with daughters Nava and Orli (right), suffered for years with MS attacks before having a diagnosis confirmed in 2016</p><p>Ms Elias, who works for a social care charity and lives in Edgware in London, says multiple sclerosis makes her 'struggle to function on every level'.</p><p>Mother of Nava, two, and Orli, six, she has suffered with the condition on-and-off since she was 17 years old and may end up using a wheelchair full-time if she cannot do something to relieve her symptoms.</p><p>Ms Elias explained: 'Relapses come from absolutely nowhere. There's no warning whatsoever.</p><p>'Every morning, I wake up not knowing if I'll be able to move, which is obviously very difficult with two small kids.</p><p>'At my worst, I'll experience total weakness. Even standing up for long enough to have a shower seems impossible.</p><p>'I also have brain fog and can't think properly. It's like my brain has been replaced by a giant fuzzy sponge.</p><p>'I struggle to function on every level. Every time I relapse, there is more irreversible damage done to my nervous system.'</p><p>As well as debilitating fatigue, Ms Elias experiences balance issues, numbness and tingling in her legs, foot drop in her left leg – which leaves her requiring a brace, spasms and periods of temporary paralysis.</p><p>Ms Elias says MS attacks make her 'struggle to function on every level' (pictured with – from left – her mother Hilary, two-year-old daughter Nava, six-year-old daughter Orli, and grandmother Hazel)</p><p>Due to the uncertain nature of the condition she is unable to get an exact prognosis, but has been warned she may require a wheelchair full time in the future.</p><p>Ms Elias did not start taking medication until her diagnosis was confirmed by a doctor in England, despite an Israeli doctor telling her she had MS 10 years earlier. </p><p>Multiple sclerosis, known as MS, is a condition in which the immune system attacks the body and causes nerve damage to the brain and spinal cord.</p><p>It is an incurable, lifelong condition which ranges from producing fairly mild symptoms to causing severe disability.</p><p>Around 100,000 people are thought to be diagnosed with MS in the UK, and around 2.3 million worldwide.</p><p>It is more than twice as common in women as it is in men and is usually diagnosed in their 20s and 30s.</p><p>Symptoms include fatigue, difficulty walking, vision problems, bladder problems, numbness or tingling, muscle stiffness and spasms, problems with balance and co-ordination, and problems with thinking, learning and planning.</p><p>The majority of sufferers will have episodes of symptoms which go away and come back, while some have ones which get gradually worse over time.</p><p>Symptoms can be managed with medication and therapy, but the condition shortens the average life expectancy by around five to 10 years.</p><p>The condition causes the immune system to attack the body and damage nerves in the brain and spinal cord.</p><p>MS is incurable and a lifelong chronic condition which affects around 100,000 people in the UK and 2.3 million worldwide. </p><p>After Ms Elias's first attack when she was 17 – 17 years ago – she went to hospital but doctors' tests did not reveal what was wrong with her. </p><p>She said: 'Out of nowhere, I was super poorly. I was so fatigued and could barely move my legs.'</p><p>Eventually, Ms Elias was so sick she had to drop out of school and, over the next year, tried a variety of treatments – including physiotherapy and hydrotherapy – to help rebuild her strength.</p><p>But baffled medics still failed to pinpoint the cause of her sudden decline.</p><p>'At one point, it was suggested I was a hypochondriac, or that this was all in my head, which was incredibly frustrating,' she said.</p><p>A hypochondriac is someone who obsesses over symptoms and thinks small problems are a sign of a serious medical issue.</p><p>'Eventually, I got a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome, but that felt to me like they were clutching at straws and didn't know what else to say,' Ms Elias added.</p><p>Still struggling, she returned to school, largely relying on a wheelchair to get around.</p><p>Gradually, she began to feel well more often, which meant she could go to university. </p><p>But, during a year out studying in Israel in 2006, she relapsed.</p><p>'Luckily, I had travel insurance, so I went to see a neurologist out there and was diagnosed with MS,' she said.</p><p>Ms Elias says MS makes her 'struggle to function on every level', which is difficult when she is trying to raise her two daughters Orli, six, and Nava, two</p><p>'That was the first time the condition had ever been mentioned to me.</p><p>'I felt such an array of emotions. On one hand, after all this time it was finally being validated that something was wrong. </p><p>'It wasn't all in my head and I no longer had a big unknown hanging over me.</p><p>'But on the other, I was only young, on my own and away from home.'</p><p>Heading back to the UK, Ms Elias sought confirmation of her diagnosis – but, when they ran tests, medics were unable to find enough evidence to give her any definite answers.</p><p>Exasperated, she tried to manage her symptoms and get on with her life.</p><p>Then, while pregnant with her youngest daughter, Nava in 2016, she relapsed once again.</p><p>Ms Elias had a big relapse when she was pregnant with her youngest child, Nava (right) in 2016 (pictured left, her older daughter, Orli)</p><p>'I'd been deteriorating throughout my pregnancy,' she said. </p><p>'By then I'd moved from Essex to London, so I saw a different set of doctors, and was referred to the neurological team at the Royal Free Hospital in Hampstead.</p><p>'They did as many tests as they could, but they wanted to do an MRI scan after I'd given birth.</p><p>'I eventually had it and went back for the results, expecting it to be all clear. Instead, the doctor told me I definitely had MS.'</p><p>Her diagnosis finally confirmed, Ms Elias had to wait until she had finished breastfeeding before she could start taking medication in the form of three daily injections of disease modifying drugs.</p><p>While her symptoms persisted, it was hoped the drugs would at least prevent a relapse.</p><p>But, in March 2018, she relapsed once again, prompting doctors to change the type of medication.</p><p>Now she is determined to fight back against the disease and is trying to crowdfund a stem cell transplant which will cost £50,000 at a hospital in Moscow.</p><p>'The protective casing – or myelin – is damaged, so it's not connecting and carrying electrical signals properly.' </p><p>Ms Elias says her brain is 'like a broken phone charger' and she is trying to raise £50,000 for a pioneering stem cell treatment in Russia (pictured with daughters Nava, two, and Orli, six)</p><p> 'This treatment would essentially reboot my immune system. My stem cells are harvested, then I have a week of intensive chemo to completely wipe my immune system.</p><p>'Then, when the stem cells are put back in again, it's almost as if my body will forget I have MS.' </p><p>According to the MS Society, the haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) procedure – which is currently unavailable on the NHS – works by administering a low dose of chemotherapy to encourage stem cells to move from the bone marrow into the blood.</p><p>Then, when there are sufficient cells in the blood, they are removed and stored, while a more intense form of chemotherapy is given to wipe out the immune system.</p><p>Finally, the stem cells are transplanted back into the blood, once the chemotherapy drugs have left the system.</p><p>Many patients are kept in isolation for the month-long treatment, to avoid having their immune systems compromised.</p><p>Ms Elias said: 'I see HSCT as my best chance. If it works, it'll eliminate the threat of needing a wheelchair and get rid of that fear hanging over me.</p><p>'I won't have to worry about standing up and making it through the day. I can put the kids to bed or take them on days out without being absolutely on my knees with fatigue.</p><p>'I've spoken to people who've had great success with HSCT. Some have even seen the lesions in their brains shrink.</p><p>'It's been a great help to talk to other people living with MS - especially people willing to try innovative treatments - as it shows me I'm not alone.'</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	Official guidance for parents confused over what to feed their babies

    Official guidance for parents confused over what to feed their babies

    irst time in 24 years to help parents know what to feed their babies.</p><p>Data suggests three-quarters of infants in the UK are being fed too many calories, the major cause of obesity.</p><p>Experts hope the worrying trend will be reversed by the updated guidelines, issued by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN).</p><p>Data suggests three-quarters of infants in the UK are being fed too many calories, the major cause of obesity</p><p>Officials made numerous recommendations in the 1970s and 1980s in an attempt to change the feeding habits of babies in light of emerging health benefits and risks.</p><p>But the last of those reports was published in the 1990s, and it has since provided much of the advice over the past two decades.</p><p>The SACN report read: 'There has been no comprehensive risk assessment of infant and young child feeding in the UK since... 1994.' </p><p>Recommendations made by the group about peanuts, breastfeeding, cows' milk and foods high in sugar and salt, are mostly already in place.</p><p>The Government already advises mothers feed their babies with breastmilk until they are at least six months, and only then gradually introduce solids.</p><p>And they say babies should not be given cows' milk before they turn one, or foods high in sugar because they can rot their teeth.</p><p>Foods high in salt should also be avoided, the NHS says, as they can contribute to high blood pressure later in life and get infants hooked on salt.</p><p>The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition yesterday urged the Government to review its advice on giving babies vitamin A supplements.</p><p>Current guidelines urge parents to give children over the age of six months several daily supplements, including vitamin A, vital for vision, growth and the immune system.</p><p>But the SACN argued there is a 'low prevalence' vitamin A deficiency in healthy infants in the UK, despite the low uptake of supplements.</p><p>It suggested this should prompt a review into the evidence of vitamin A, 'particularly in light' of some studies that show supplements could allow infants to have harmful amounts of the vitamin.</p><p>The SACN said: 'It is recommended Government consider opportunities to review advice on supplements and foods containing vitamin A during infancy.'</p><p>Guidelines already exist to say it is safe for babies to be introduced to crushed or grounded peanuts at six months - as long as there is no family history of allergies.</p><p>He said 'exclusive breastfeeding until six months of age and not introducing solid foods until around this time' would help avoid infants becoming 'too heavy'.</p><p>But the guidelines do not take into account the results of a major study last week, which showed the benefits of feeding babies solid food from three months.</p><p>Researchers funded by the Food Standards Agency and Medical Research Council found doing so could help babies sleep better and improve their long-term health. </p><p>The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, suggested that current advice is flawed - and implied babies do better if solid food is given earlier, alongside breastmilk.  </p><p>Parents have been told for years to delay introducing solid food, to encourage mothers to continue breastfeeding for as long as possible. </p><p>However, most mothers in Britain already ignore this advice, according to various official surveys of infant feeding habits. </p><p>Around 75 per cent introduce solids before five months, and a quarter do so to stop their babies becoming hungry overnight. </p><p>The NHS Choices website claims this is a mistake - and solid foods will not make babies more likely to sleep through the night. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • Hall of Fame QB Jim Kelly to have cancer checkup after 'something came up'

    Hall of Fame QB Jim Kelly to have cancer checkup after 'something came up'

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>NFL Hall of Famer Jim Kelly talks to Julie Banderas about overcoming obstacles like the death of his eight-year-old son and beating cancer twice</p><p>Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly will travel to New York City next month for an unexpected checkup after “something came up” during his recovery from surgery for oral cancer.</p><p>“My doctors are in New York. I'm not there every day. So I want to be sure that everything [that] is going on, is going on for the right reasons,” he said. “Just like everybody, if you go through a broken leg or something, you got to have checkups. If there is a little pain here [where] you think there shouldn't be anything, you got to get it checked. Even though I'm blessed to have [the doctor] at [Erie County Medical Center] I go to in Buffalo look and make sure that things are going pretty good, it helps.”</p><p>The former Buffalo Bills legend had follow-up surgery on his jaw last month before he is set to receive permanent dentures in September, ESPN reported.</p><p>“I’m not sure what's going on,” Kelly said. “I have some things that I want to have looked at, and then we'll go from there. I don't know whether I'm going to be here for two days, four days or in and out. And then hopefully I pray when September has rolled around that I can finally bite into a piece of meat and not soup every day.”</p><p>Kelly was first diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, which led to him having surgery to have a portion of his upper jaw removed in June 2013. Follow-up tests nine months later showed the cancer spread to his sinus, which led to radiation and chemotherapy treatments. Kelly lost 70 pounds while being treated.</p><p>The effects of the cancer and treatments led to Kelly having trouble speaking. He could also no longer produce saliva and had lost the sense of taste.</p><p>Kelly spent 11 seasons with the Bills before retiring following the 1996 season and has since made Buffalo his home.</p><p>He was part of the Bills’ most successful era, in which the team played in four consecutive Super Bowls — all losses — in the early 1990s.</p><p>Kelly will receive the Jimmy V Award for Perseverance at the 2018 ESPY Awards on Wednesday in Los Angeles.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 July 18, 2018
  • 
	NHS is paying DOUBLE for stationery and supplies

    NHS is paying DOUBLE for stationery and supplies

    to £2.10 when they could be purchased on the High Street for £1.04, according to Freedom of Information disclosures. </p><p>Thirty-packs of bed pads also cost the NHS £4.42, which is 12 per cent more than the cheapest identical packs available to the public.</p><p>In total, the health service spends £55.6 billion a year on general supplies and medical equipment.  </p><p>Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has previously described such spending as 'baffling'.</p><p>The NHS is paying double for stationery and supplies, new figures reveal (stock)</p><p>Waiting times at over-stretched A&amp;E units are at their worst level since records began, according to official figures revealed April 2018.</p><p>Experts said the NHS was in the grip of an 'eternal winter' and many hospitals are still struggling to cope with the unprecedented pressure. </p><p>Health and Social Care Secretary Jeremy Hunt was forced to admit it was the 'worst winter ever' amid a severe outbreak of flu and cold weather.</p><p>Chiefs cancelled thousands of operations in a controversial move to ease pressure. And experts have suggested this may be the only option to stop a crisis next year. </p><p>The latest monthly data from NHS England also shows that waiting times for routine operations, such as knee and hip replacements, are at their highest since 2004.  </p><p>And violent assaults on staff have risen by 10 per cent in a year – partly driven by frustration with waiting times. </p><p>He added, however, some NHS trusts only report the product price in their spending while others include additional costs, like delivery charges.</p><p>Yet Mr Anandaciva said: 'Even accepting these issues, substantial unwarranted variation remains - partly because different NHS organisations use different products for similar types of treatment and partly because they pay different prices for the same product.'</p><p>For example, one NHS Trust paid £8.29 for a box of A4 paper while another was charged nearly a third more at £10.62. </p><p>Many also pay double the price shoppers do for toilet tissue.</p><p>Mr Anandaciva added: 'There has been a lack of data on what different organisations are paying and a fragmented approach to using the NHS's collective buying power to best effect, with organisations often operating as islands rather than archipelagos.' </p><p>NHS trusts source most of their stationery and supplies through NHS Supply Chain, which is run by the German logistics firm DHL for NHS Business Services Authority. </p><p>Some commissioners have complained about a lack of pricing transparency and certain products being more expensive in its catalogue than on the internet or high street, despite buying in bulk.</p><p>This supplier will be replaced this year by a new system, which could save the NHS £1 billion.</p><p>According to Mr Anandaciva, this new direction should improve efficiency and productivity but is not enough to save the substantial costs the NHS spends on such supplies.</p><p>NHS Improvement argues such changes will help it save £810 million in the next two years. </p><p>Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has previously described such spending as 'baffling'</p><p>This comes after news released last March suggested a controversial Airbnb-like scheme that sees homeowners receive up to £1,000 a month to rent their rooms to hospital patients could be rolled out in Cambridgeshire.</p><p>Dubbed 'Carebnb' and described as 'Airbnb for social care', the private start-up CareRooms for those recuperating after treatment is bidding to launch a new trial in the county.</p><p>This comes after it was forced to terminate its first pilot with the NHS in Essex last November - despite receiving around 600 applications in three days - after concerns were raised about care being provided by non-professionals.</p><p>CareRooms was devised as a radical way to free up hospital space, as bed-blocking rates remain high while the NHS battles a heavy winter.</p><p>Despite facing an avalanche of criticism, CareRooms is establishing a 'working group' with Cambridgeshire County Council and has begun advertising for 'host' households in the county.</p><p>The Conservative-controlled council confirmed the group would meet for the first time imminently to discuss the 'innovative CareRooms concept' but adds it has not committed to the pilot yet.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 July 18, 2018

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