'Laughing in the face of our cancer'

Inspiring: Rachael Bland, left, Lauren Mahon, middle, and Deborah James 

Deborah James, 36, is a former deputy head teacher from London. In December 2016, the mother- of-two was diagnosed with stage four bowel cancer. She is known to her social media followers as @bowelbabe

Read my latest blog post, then we can talk about something normal’ is how I respond sometimes when people ask me how I am. It’s tiring having to answer the same question a thousand times. 

One in two of us get cancer so it’s crazy we still haven’t worked out how to normalise it.

I had classic symptoms six months before diagnosis – I lost half a stone, I was exhausted, I was going to the toilet eight times a day and there was often blood.

But I was a fit young mum and doctors assumed it was bad IBS. When I finally got a referral, a colonoscopy showed a 6.5cm tumour in my bowel.

I thought I was going to die. But one bowel resection, four lung operations (cancer spread to my lungs) and 21 cycles of chemotherapy later, here I still am, achieving things I wouldn’t have dreamt of, such as writing a book and posing for photoshoots. 

Sure, some days I can’t lift my head off the pillow, but recording the podcast is a perfect distraction.

We chat about things you don’t read in leaflets – such as fertility, what we look like and what a proper poo looks like – and have a bit of a laugh. 

I feel going public is good for my children (Hugo, ten, and Eloise, eight) too. I take comfort from knowing that if things don’t turn out well, they will always know who I am and how I feel about them.

Lauren Mahon, 32, a social media consultant, lives in London and was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2016, aged 31.

Lauren Mahon, 32, a social media consultant, lives in London and was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2016, aged 31

Doctors discovered my aggressive tumour two months after I’d partied for three days at Glastonbury. I burst out crying, telling my consultant I didn’t want to die. ‘But you’re not going to,’ she said. 

She was right – my tumour was localised so treatment was eight rounds of chemotherapy, followed by a lumpectomy, 21 doses of radiation, then hormonal treatment.

My ‘chemo brain’ struck after the third cycle of treatment so I had to give up work. I then started to post on Instagram using #GIRLvs CANCER to connect with like-minded women.

With Deborah and Rachael it was like gossiping over cocktails, while others gave me pity faces.

I could talk about the odd experience of telling a guy you have cancer on a first date. Most were fine with it, and it gave me a much-needed boost to have a drink with someone I fancied.

Now I’m lucky to have the all-clear. Next month, I start a new job and am launching my own T-shirt brand with 25 per cent of profits going to cancer charities.

Rachael Bland, 40, is a BBC radio presenter, diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer in November 2016

When I was diagnosed I’d stare at my long blonde hair and think: ‘I can’t believe in a few months I’ll look sick and bald.’ 

But I never lost my hair – cold caps are a godsend. Treatment wasn’t how I imagined: they put a cannula in your arm, you chat with nurses, play Monopoly, go home. 

My side effects weren’t much worse than a bad hangover so I could go on working. Another tumour was found in the same breast last July and I had a mastectomy. 

I needed more chemo and 15 rounds of radiotherapy. Afterwards, a scan showed the cancer had spread to the lymph nodes on my opposite side. 

I had those taken out in February this year. I looked to social media for others going through a similar experience and found thousands of strong, inspiring women. 

This sparked the idea of a podcast to normalise the disease. Despite being ‘Twitter friends’, Deborah, Lauren and I first met at the podcast recording but it was as if we’d known each other for years. 

Since then I’ve received hundreds of emails saying: ‘I’ve laughed and cried, not because I’m sad but because you are speaking exactly of my experience.’

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April 16, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

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    1 April 17, 2018
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	Children more likely to have lower IQs if mothers are depressed

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    Woman, 21, who paid £5,000 to have her leg amputated said it was the 'best decision' of her life

    was the best decision of her life after she lost 4st (56lbs) in weight and became a champion triathlete. </p><p>Hannah Moore, 21, was wheelchair-bound after a routine procedure for an ingrown toenail triggered a poorly understand condition that left her in agonising pain.</p><p>She claims her Complex Regional Pain Syndrome caused an infection, which turned her foot black and led to her fighting for her life in hospital after it triggered sepsis.</p><p>And since the life-changing surgery, Miss Moore, who now weighs 8st 7lbs (119lbs), has gone from strength to strength, becoming a super-fit triathlete. </p><p>She is now aiming to compete at the Tokyo Paralympics in 2020 and has been fitted with a revolutionary prosthetic cycling leg to help propel her to a gold medal.</p><p>Hannah Moore, 21, who paid £5,000 to have her leg amputated, said it was the best decision of her life after she lost 4st (56lbs) in weight and became a champion triathlete</p><p>Miss Moore said: 'I have achieved so much more than I ever thought I would and this is just the beginning which is very exciting' (pictured before her weight loss)</p><p>Speaking about her decision to have her right leg amputated for the first time, Miss Moore said: 'Since having my amputation I’ve never felt sorry for myself.</p><p>'It’s all been about making the most out of situation showing to myself as much as anyone that a "disability" doesn’t have to define what you can and can’t do.</p><p>'I have achieved so much more than I ever thought I would and this is just the beginning which is very exciting.'  </p><p>Miss Moore's new custom-made £10,000 'cycling leg' has been designed by leading prosthetics firm Dorset Orthopaedic.</p><p>The light-weight carbon-fibre limb clips directly to the pedal meaning no power is lost when she pushes down.</p><p>As well as enabling her to transfer more power to the bike, her new leg also provides her with far greater stability when going around corners.</p><p>Before, she used a normal prosthetic leg for the cycling part of the triathlon, which was attached to a trainer strapped to the pedal and was wobbly.</p><p>And since the life-changing surgery, Miss Moore, who now weighs 8st 7lbs (119lbs), has gone from strength to strength, becoming a super-fit triathlete</p><p>She claims her Complex Regional Pain Syndrome caused an infection, which turned her foot black and led to her fighting for her life in hospital after it triggered sepsis</p><p>Miss Moore said the new leg should give her an edge over competitors. She said: 'Having my leg amputated was the best decision I’ve ever made. </p><p>'The things I have achieved I would never have without this operation. I am a British champion and now my dream is to compete in Tokyo.</p><p>'The custom-made cycling leg is designed to be aerodynamic.'</p><p>She added: 'It is a lot lighter than the leg I was previously using and because it attaches to the pedal there is a lot more power transfer.</p><p>'With my normal leg there is a lot of movement in it so some of the power gets lost.</p><p>'It feels amazing, really different, so much more comfortable and I have so much more balance going around corners.' </p><p>Miss Moore will remove the artificial limb and replace it with a blade for the running part of a triathlon.</p><p>Matthew Hughes, a prosthetist at Dorset Orthopaedic, said the streamlined design should help her improve her times on the bike.</p><p>He said: 'Our design will help her generate more power and improve her times.</p><p>She is now aiming to compete at the Tokyo Paralympics in 2020 and has been fitted with a revolutionary prosthetic cycling leg to help propel her to a gold medal</p><p>Speaking about her decision to have her right leg amputated for the first time, Miss Moore said: 'Since having my amputation I’ve never felt sorry for myself'</p><p>Complex Regional Pain Syndrome usually develops after an injury, often a minor injury.</p><p>The pain is often unconnected to the seriousness of the injury and can be out of all proportion from what the sufferer would expect.</p><p>The condition is little-understood, but some medical experts think it is caused by damage to the nervous system, which causes nerves to misfire in some way, triggering pain.</p><p>If left untreated the pain can spread to other parts of the body too.</p><p>Some sufferers have repeated episodes of pain followed by stretches of pain-free remission.</p><p>It can be treated by physiotherapy, to prevent muscle wasting, certain types of painkillers and counselling to help people cope with the chronic pain. </p><p>'The science behind the shape of the leg is to make it more aerodynamic and we have used a pre-pregnated carbon fibre which hasn’t been used for cycling legs before.</p><p>'There should be better power transfer and stability when she is pushing down on the pedals.</p><p>'Hannah should be proud of the progress she has made in such a short space of time.' </p><p>Miss Moore was a 15-year-old national karate champion when she underwent a routine procedure for an ingrowing toenail.</p><p>However, it triggered the rare Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), which blighted her life for the next four years.</p><p>She suffered with severe pain and swelling and the blood vessels in her right foot became infected, which then triggered sepsis - a violent immune response.</p><p>Ulcers formed on her foot and despite over 50 operations and numerous skin grafts they would not heal. The situation got so bad that she was left wheelchair-bound.</p><p>At that point, Miss Moore made the tough decision to have her right leg amputated to stop the pain even though she was told there was no guarantee it would work.</p><p>The NHS refused to carry out the amputation since it was not their recommended treatment for CRPS and it argued she would still be in pain afterwards.</p><p>Miss Moore's new custom-made £10,000 'cycling leg' has been designed by leading prosthetics firm Dorset Orthopaedic</p><p>The light-weight carbon-fibre limb clips directly to the pedal meaning no power is lost when she pushes down</p><p>But other surgeons claimed there was a chance the operation could take away her pain so her family paid privately for the procedure in July 2016.</p><p>The gamble paid off as the Yeovil College student is no longer in pain and is the fittest she has been in her life.</p><p>Last August, she became the British PTS4 Paratriathlon Champion and she will begin a sports and exercise degree at Loughborough University later this year.</p><p>She said: 'I started training three months after the amputation and obviously started off really slowly and have just built on that over time.</p><p>'I did wheelchair racing before I had my leg amputated and I knew a few people who did triathlon through that, I’d always wanted to try it but I never could when I had my leg.</p><p>'The variety of training for three sports I found very appealing.</p><p>'For me the hardest times were before having my amputation as I was having operations almost every week in London and the pain was so wearing.'  </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 April 17, 2018
  • 
	Student nurse, 21, with a 1cm underbite that left her unable to eat or talk has her jaw realigned

    Student nurse, 21, with a 1cm underbite that left her unable to eat or talk has her jaw realigned

    going grueling jaw-reconstruction surgery last December.</p><p>Holly Everson-Bullock's underbite jutted out more than one centimetre for 10 years, causing her to endure cruel bullying at school.</p><p>As well as having a huge impact on her confidence, the condition also made it difficult for Ms Everson-Bullock, 21, from Gloucester, to speak or eat due to her mouth not closing properly.</p><p>After having braces fitted to align her teeth, Ms Everson-Bullock 'cried with happiness' when her dentist said she was finally ready for surgery.</p><p>Although it took months for the swelling to go down, with Ms Everson-Bullock being unable to eat solid food or talk for six weeks, she says she 'finally has her smile back'.</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock said: 'After the surgery I have a lot of my confidence back. I smile a lot more than I used to because I'm not as self-conscious about it.' </p><p>Student nurse Holly Everson-Bullock finally feels able to smile after undergoing grueling jaw-reconstruction surgery last December (pictured after the procedure)</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock's underbite jutted out over 1cm, causing her to endure bullying at school</p><p>Surgery to realign her jaw left Ms Everson-Bullock with severe swelling for months </p><p>An underbite occurs when a person's lower teeth and jaw protrude over their upper teeth.</p><p>This is usually inherited from a parent who also has the condition.</p><p>Other causes include thumb sucking, babies using dummies and prolonged bottle feeding. </p><p>Aside from a sufferer's appearance, other symptoms can include headaches, poor self-esteem and teeth grinding or breaking. </p><p>Braces are the most common treatment but can make wearers, particularly children, feel self conscious.</p><p>Specially-made headgears can be effective but are highly noticeable and often uncomfortable.</p><p>In extreme cases, surgery to shave off the jaw bone is required as a last resort.</p><p>It is unclear how many people suffer from an underbite in the UK or US.</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock first started to notice her underbite when she was 11, which caused her to feel attractive throughout her teens. </p><p>She said: 'Having the underbite just didn't make me feel very attractive. I used to wonder why my jaw was like this and why couldn't it be normal.</p><p>'I think I noticed it more than other people but I did get some nasty comments from people at school about my jaw who said it was weird.</p><p>'I used to do acting a lot and have done it since I was young but I had to give it up as the underbite made it really difficult to talk.</p><p>'I tried not to let my underbite stop me from doing things but if I went on a night out I was just really self-conscious of it, I thought people would notice it</p><p>'If people took videos of me singing you could really see it and I didn't like that at all.' </p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock struggled to pronounce words clearly, or eat properly, due to her mouth not closing properly.  </p><p>She said: 'It was struggle to eat. I couldn't eat anything crunchy and I definitely couldn't eat an apple normally and I had to cut a lot of food up.</p><p>'I had to kind of hook it with my bottom teeth, if I did it any other way I wouldn't get any of the actual apple, just the skin.' </p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock's underbite made her feel unattractive, which shattered her confidence</p><p>Due to her mouth being unable to close properly, Ms Everson-Bullock struggled to eat and talk</p><p>Her jaw alignment left Ms Everson-Bullock unable to eat crunchy food, like apples and pears</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock (pictured before) was self conscious of her jaw on night outs </p><p>She was forced to give up her love of acting due to her impaired speech (pictured before)</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock (pictured before) was aware she noticed her underbite more than others</p><p>In the lead up to surgery, Ms Everson-Bullock had braces fitted to help align her teeth.</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock said: 'I was given braces in February 2016 to align my jaw ready for surgery. A month into having them I realised I was really struggling to adjust to them.</p><p>'The underbite got worse which meant eating became even more difficult.</p><p>'I went to a normal appointment for a checkup and alignment with my braces and my orthodontist told me that I was ready for surgery.</p><p>'I was completely blown away when I was finally ready. I had been waiting for it for so long I couldn't stop crying with happiness.</p><p>'On the day of my surgery I was just ready to get it over and done with. In the weeks leading up to it I just wanted it to be done.</p><p>She said: 'There was a bit of doubt and worry in my head but I tried not to let fear get in the way of things.</p><p>'I tried to keep looking at it in a positive way and I didn't want to panic too much.'</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock barely recognised her severely swollen face after enduring surgery</p><p>Jaw realignment caused Ms Everson-Bullock's eyes and nose to change shape</p><p>The swelling forced Ms Everson-Bullock to live off liquid-based foods for months </p><p>Severe swelling left Ms Everson-Bullock (pictured after) unable to talk for six weeks </p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock (pictured after) said she tried not to let her underbite hold her back </p><p>After surgery, Ms Everson-Bullock was shocked at how swollen her face was, saying: 'My dad took a picture and showed me and I couldn't believe it.</p><p>'After the swelling had gone down a little I remember looking in the mirror and just being in disbelief.</p><p>'It didn't feel like me. My face had changed so much.'</p><p>Although Ms Everson-Bullock was surprised to find her nose and eyes altered slightly once her jaw was better aligned, she was eventually delighted with the results.</p><p>She said: 'The first two-to-three months of recovery were quite difficult as I had to wait for the swelling to go down.</p><p>'I couldn't talk for six weeks which I found so difficult and I could only drink liquids, I couldn't eat solid food.</p><p>'Just over four months later the swelling has really reduced now and I finally have my smile back.</p><p>'I bit into a pear for the first time the other day and I was so happy. It's the little things that really make a difference. </p><p>'My family, friend and boyfriend have been incredible throughout the whole journey and I can't thank the surgical and orthodontic team at Gloucester Royal Infirmary enough.'</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock (pictured after surgery) says she finally has her smile back </p><p>She has had braces fitted again to help better realign her teeth (pictured after)</p><p>Said the 'little things', such as being able to eat a pear, make a big difference (pictured after)</p><p>Ms Everson-Bullock (pictured after) says she is 'so happy' now she has her confidence back</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 April 17, 2018
  • 
	Scientists edge closer to HIV vaccine that can be given once a year

    Scientists edge closer to HIV vaccine that can be given once a year

    the virus for at least 18 weeks, suggesting the jab could offer people months of immunity, a study by Rockefeller University, New York, found.</p><p>People at high risk of becoming infected, such as those with HIV-positive partners, can take the preventative drug PrEP before sex, however, there is no long-term, effective jab.</p><p>Developing such a vaccine is difficult due to HIV 'hiding' from people's immune systems, however, including certain proteins in the injection cause immune cells to recognise parts of the 'envelope' that surround the virus, the research adds.</p><p>According to the researchers, their findings, published in the journal Nature Medicine, 'lay the groundwork' for a preventative vaccine that could be given as little as once a year.</p><p>More than 1.1 million people in the US are living with HIV, with one in seven being unaware of it.  </p><p>Currently, there is no cure for HIV. Lifelong antiviral treatment controls the infection but often causes side effects including nausea, vomiting and insomnia. </p><p>Scientists are edging closer to a long-term preventative HIV vaccine (stock)</p><p>This drug in particular is fixed-dose combination of two anti-retroviral drugs, tenofovir and FTC, in one pill. </p><p>They work together to interfere with an enzyme which HIV uses to infect new cells, slowing down the virus's attack or preventing it altogether. </p><p>The drug is designed for people that have not yet been exposed to the virus to protect themselves against it. </p><p>Alternatively, people who have been exposed can take PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis), a month-long course of drugs started within 72 hours of exposure.</p><p>This comes after health officials revealed last November that Europe's HIV epidemic is growing at an 'alarming pace' as infections reached their highest level in 2016 since records began.</p><p>In 2016, around 160,000 people contracted HIV, which causes AIDS, in 53 European countries, according to a report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.</p><p>Over the past decade, the rate of newly-diagnosed HIV infections in Europe has risen by 52 percent from 12 in every 100,000 people in 2007 to 18.2 per 100,000 in 2016, the research adds.</p><p>According to the report, this increase was 'mainly driven by the continuing upward trend in the East', which accounts for around 80 percent of Europe's cases.</p><p>Zsuzsanna Jakab, European regional director of the WHO, previously said: 'This is the highest number of cases recorded in one year. If this trend persists, we will not be able to achieve the target of ending the HIV epidemic by 2030.'</p><p>Past findings suggest HIV rates are rising in eastern Europe, particularly in those over 50 who inject illegal drugs. This is thought to be due to a lack of awareness campaigns on the infection's risks or how to prevent transmission. </p><p>Over 1.1 million people in the US are living with HIV, with one in seven being unaware (stock)</p><p>Despite HIV rates rising in Europe, figures released last July showed deaths linked to AIDS have halved in 10 years. AIDS is a syndrome that can occur in the late stages of HIV infection.</p><p>Global fatality numbers fell to one million in 2016 from 1.9 million in 2005, according to a report by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/Aids (UNAids).</p><p>The report claims the 'scales have been tipped' due to more than half of patients now having access to treatment.</p><p>Targets aim to have 30 million patients receiving therapy by 2020.</p><p>Eastern and southern Africa are 'leading the way' and have reduced new HIV infections by nearly a third since 2010, according to the report. </p><p>UNAids has set a 2020 target known as '90-90-90', which aims for 90 percent of HIV patients to receive a diagnosis, of which 90 percent will be treated, of which 90 percent will have their infection suppressed.</p><p>In 2016 these figures were 70 percent, 77 percent and 82 percent, respectively. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 April 17, 2018
  • 
	Mother says she looked like Freddy Krueger due to her burns

    Mother says she looked like Freddy Krueger due to her burns

    from a horrific work explosion that melted her face and left her 'looking like Freddy Krueger'.</p><p>Wendy Hines, from Arkansas, was left with second and third-degree burns to her face, arms and hands. Doctors told her she was lucky to be alive. </p><p>She thought her scars, which she was told would be permanent, made her look like Freddy Krueger, the burned serial killer in The Nightmare on Elm Street franchise.</p><p>But Ms Hines, 44, has made a remarkable recovery from her terrifying experience and regained her beauty after her sisters gave her round-the-clock care.</p><p>She has been left scar-free and no longer feels self-conscious about her face, after she hid herself indoors for eight months while she healed.</p><p>Wendy Hines was told she was lucky to be alive - but would be left with permanent scars from her ordeal (pictured left in May, in hospital, after suffering the burn, and right after recovering)</p><p>Speaking about her ordeal two years ago for the first time, she said: 'Although I was grateful to be alive, hearing how badly how I was hurt terrified me.</p><p>'My injuries were agonising and I worried about how I looked. My sisters Christy (40) and Brandy (42) kept telling me I looked gorgeous.</p><p>'It took me a week to look in the mirror after the explosion and when I did, I thought I looked like Freddy Krueger.</p><p>Ms Hines continued: 'My face was blistered and cracked. My eyebrows, eyelashes and hair had been singed off.</p><p>'I was horrified and didn't even recognise my own reflection. I burst out crying, while my sisters hugged me. I thought I was never going to look the same way I did before.</p><p>'My vision in my left eye was blurry as a piece of metal had hit it in the explosion. I panicked I'd be left blind.'</p><p>But, Ms Hines, who is a mother to 24-year-old Brittany, added: 'Almost two years on and the scars have disappeared from my face. </p><p>'I'm thankful to have healed so well, I no longer feel self-conscious about my looks. Doctors were astounded at my progress.' </p><p>The accident happened when Ms Hines was working as an operator for a defence technology plant, which produces flares for the UK and US armed forces.</p><p>She was drying explosive powders when the machine overheated and exploded, hurling her 125ft (38m) in the air. </p><p>The blast scorched her face, chest and hands. Ms Hines, who was left with pieces of metal in her elbow, said: 'Pain seared through me.</p><p>'Glancing down, I saw that my hands were bright red with burns and blood poured from an orange-sized wound on my left leg.' </p><p>Quick-thinking colleagues called paramedics while Ms Hines' father, Walter, 69, rushed to her side.</p><p>A helicopter arrived just an hour later and flew her to the burns unit at Arkansas Children's Hospital, where she was sedated for three days.</p><p>Ms Hines, from Arkansas, was left with second and third-degree burns to her face, arms and hands (pictured in 2015, before the explosion)</p><p>The 44-year-old thought her scars made her look like Freddy Krueger, the burned serial killer behind The Nightmare on Elm Street franchise</p><p>The blast scorched her face, chest and hands. Ms Hines, who was left with pieces of metal in her elbow, said: 'Pain seared through me' (pictured in hospital)</p><p>Ms Hines, who is a mother to 24-year-old Brittany, added: 'Almost two years on and the scars have disappeared from my face' (pictured before the explosion in 2015)</p><p>Ms Hines said: 'When I woke up, my body was covered in bandages head to toe, I looked like a mummy.</p><p>'I even lost all my hair from the flames, I was distraught and sobbing in the hospital.'</p><p>Doctors revealed that 20 per cent of Ms Hines' face had been burnt in the blast and she was lucky to be alive.</p><p>While in hospital, she underwent three surgeries on her right elbow to remove the shrapnel and 12 laser surgeries on her hands.</p><p>Doctors also told her that she had lost 30 per cent of her hearing in her left ear, and 40 per cent in the other.</p><p>Ms Hines was discharged from hospital after three weeks. But her extensive injuries meant she was unable to care for herself.</p><p>Doctors revealed that 20 per cent of Ms Hines' face had been burnt in the blast and she was lucky to be alive</p><p>While in hospital, she underwent three surgeries on her right elbow to remove the shrapnel and 12 laser surgeries on her hands (pictured, her burnt legs)</p><p>Ms Hines said: 'Luckily my six sisters cared for me, they came to my house every day' (pictured with her sisters, from left-to-right: Amy, 44, Brandy, 42, and Christy, 40)</p><p>She said: 'I could barely dress myself, feed myself or pick anything up. I was like a child again, learning how to pick up a pencil and how to write.</p><p>'Luckily my six sisters cared for me, they came to my house every day and practically lived with me.</p><p>'They applied creams and hot towels to my face every hour even through the night.' </p><p>Over the next eight months, Ms Hines was terrified of revealing her face in public and she became a recluse.</p><p>She said: 'I hid myself indoors as I worried strangers would think I was ugly. When I finally ventured outside nine months later, I hid my face with a scarf and a hat.' </p><p>Now, Ms Hines has made a miraculous recovery thanks to her sisters' loving care.</p><p>The accident happened when Ms Hines was working as an operator for a defence technology plant, which produces flares for the UK and US armed forces</p><p>Over a period of eight months, Ms Hines was terrified of revealing her face in public and she became a recluse (pictured in hospital)</p><p>She added: 'My face is finally back to how I looked before the accident. Doctors told me that I'm blessed and I've healed incredibly.</p><p>'I am so thankful to my sisters, if it wasn't for their help, my face wouldn't look as good as it does now.</p><p>'Although my hands are still terribly burnt, I am undergoing laser surgery on them this year to reduce the scarring.</p><p>'Since the accident, my eyesight has been affected - I struggle to read properly and or see from a distance.'</p><p>Ms Hines continued: 'I still suffer from nightmares and seeing a flame gives me terrible flashbacks of that day.</p><p>'But when I look at my face in the mirror, I finally feel beautiful again.' </p><p>Ms Hines said: 'I am so thankful to my sisters, if it wasn't for their help, my face wouldn't look as good as it does now' (pictured in the middle of sisters, from left-to-right, Brandy and Christy)</p><p>Ms Hines continued: 'I still suffer from nightmares and seeing a flame gives me terrible flashbacks of that day' (pictured in hospital with sister Christy)</p><p>Ms Hines was discharged from hospital after three weeks. But her extensive injuries meant she was unable to care for herself (pictured in hospital)</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 April 17, 2018
  • 
	Japanese scientists are developing a URINE TEST to detect breast, bowel and childhood cancers

    Japanese scientists are developing a URINE TEST to detect breast, bowel and childhood cancers

    m patient urine samples.</p><p>The engineering company Hitachi, which developed the technology two years ago, will analyse 250 urine samples for breast, colon and childhood forms of the disease alongside Nagoya University in central Japan.</p><p>Company spokesman Chiharu Odaira said: ‘If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organisation for a blood test.’</p><p>He added small children will particularly benefit from the diagnosis method, which may be available in 2020, due to them often being afraid of needles.</p><p>The technology works by detecting waste materials in urine samples that act as ‘biomarkers’ for forms of the disease, according to a Hitachi statement.</p><p>It aims to improve early cancer detection, save lives, and reduce the medical and social costs of treatment, according to Mr Odaira.</p><p>Experiments assessing the accuracy of the method are due to start later this month and end in September.</p><p>Scientists are developing a test that detects cancers from patient urine samples (stock)</p><p>Benign tumours usually grow quite slowly, do not spread and have a covering made up of normal cells.</p><p>Tumours get bigger as cells continue to divide, which stimulates the development of blood vessels to 'feed' it oxygen and nutrients.</p><p>Such growths may move into new areas by putting pressure on surrounding regions, using enzymes to break down cells or entering via tissues.</p><p>Speaking of when the diagnosis method may be available, Odaira said: ‘We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities.’</p><p>This comes after research published earlier this year suggested a new blood test detects eight different kinds of tumours before they spread elsewhere in the body.</p><p>Breast-cancer diagnoses typically involve a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected, while colon-cancer screenings generally involve a stool test and then a colonoscopy, if necessary.</p><p>This comes after news released yesterday suggested controversial plans to grow human organs inside animals have moved one step closer to going ahead in Japan.</p><p>Government officials in the Asian country are expected to overturn the ban on the practice by the autumn, according to local reports.</p><p>An expert panel, commissioned by Japanese ministers, concluded that such experiments could lead to major scientific breakthroughs.</p><p>The practice, which has prompted furious backlash from animal-rights campaigners in recent years, is already allowed for research purposes in the UK and US.</p><p>Certain biologists have left Japan to pursue such experiments, which critics consider 'gruesome', across the Pacific Ocean.</p><p>Some believe creating human organs in animals, such as pigs, could stem the growing transplant shortage.</p><p>On average, 20 people die every day while waiting for an organ transplant, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing.</p><p>Animal-welfare campaigners warn such experiments echo the fictional thriller 'Never Let Me Go'.</p><p>In the novel, adapted for the hit 2010 movie, a group of English children are cloned so that, as young adults, their organs can be used for transplants.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 April 17, 2018
  • 
	'Man with three faces' Jerome Hamon is getting used to new identity

    'Man with three faces' Jerome Hamon is getting used to new identity

    g the first person to receive two face transplants has said he is getting used to his new identity.</p><p>But the same year - in order to treat nothing more than a common cold - he was given an antibiotic incompatible with his immunosuppressive treatment.  </p><p>In 2016, he began to display signs of transplant rejection, and his new face deteriorated. By November last year, the 43-year-old's face, suffering from necrosis, had to be removed. </p><p>Hamon, who suffers from a genetic mutation which causes severely disfiguring tumours, remained in hospital without a face for two months before a compatible donor was found and a successful second transplant carried out.</p><p>Jerome Hamon (pictured) has been dubbed 'the man with three faces' after becoming the first person to receive two face transplants. He now says he is getting used to his new identity</p><p>Hamon, who suffers from a genetic mutation which causes severely disfiguring tumours and related complications is pictured, left, before his first transplant and, right, after the 2010 procedure</p><p>Still recovering in hospital three months after his latest operation, he says he has quickly accepted his new identity.</p><p>His new face remains smooth and motionless, with his skull, skin and features yet to be fully aligned, a gradual process reliant on immunosuppressant drugs which, it is hoped, will prevent his body rejecting the transplanted material.</p><p>'I feel very well in myself,' he told reporters last week as he continues his recovery from the surgery which was carried out on January 15 and 16.</p><p>'I can't wait to get rid of all this,' he adds, speaking with difficulty of all the major treatment he has undergone to become the first man to have received two face transplants.</p><p>This unprecedented feat was painstakingly carried out by the staff at the Georges-Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, and Laurent Lantieri, a professor of plastic surgery, who led the team through the multi-step procedure.</p><p>Hamon was in hospital without a face for two months before a compatible donor was found and a successful second transplant carried out. He is pictured last week as he continues to recover from the procedure</p><p>The unprecedented operation (pictured) was painstakingly carried out by the staff at the Georges-Pompidou European Hospital in Paris, and Laurent Lantieri, a professor of plastic surgery, who led the team through the multi-step procedure</p><p>It was a reunion for patient and doctor as it was Lantieri who carried out the world's first full face transplant on Hamon eight years ago. </p><p>Hamon suffers from neurofibromatosis type 1, a genetic mutation which causes severely disfiguring tumours and related complications. </p><p>Staff at the hospital said they had been 'blown away' by Hamon's 'courage, his will, his strength of character in a tragic situation'.</p><p>Bernard Cholley, an anaesthetist, said that Hamon 'never complained' while waiting for a donor and was 'even in a good mood'.</p><p>Eventually, a face donor was found for his second transplant, a 22-year-old man who had died hundreds of miles from Paris. Lantieri heard the news on a Sunday in January and the massive logistical and medical operation was swiftly launched.</p><p>The donor face was transported as quickly as possible by road on the Monday to the Georges-Pompidou hospital in Paris.</p><p>By late morning the following day, Hamon was being wheeled back to his hospital bed following the ground-breaking surgery, with his medical team noticing encouraging signs of good colour in his new face. </p><p>Staff at the hospital said they had been 'blown away' by Hamon's 'courage, his will, his strength of character in a tragic situation'</p><p>The operation answers a key question for Lantieri and the rest of the medical world; 'Can we redo a facial transplant? Yes, we can re-transplant and this is what you get!'</p><p>To avoid any rejection, the patient underwent three months of special blood treatment prior to the transplant, nephrologist Eric Thervet explained.</p><p>Despite all the anxiety and suffering, Hamon is a happy man again.</p><p>'The first transplant I accepted immediately. I thought 'this is my new face' and this time it's the same,' he explained.</p><p>'If I hadn't accepted this new face it would have been terrible. It's a question of identity... But here we are, it's good, it's me.'</p><p>There have now been around 40 face transplants throughout the world since the first was performed on Frenchwoman Isabelle Dinoire in northern France in 2005.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 April 17, 2018
  • We’re Bad at Evaluating Risk: How Doctors Can Help

    We’re Bad at Evaluating Risk: How Doctors Can Help

    hether he should get screened for prostate cancer.</p><p>Such questions trouble most doctors. We often lob the choice back to patients, or “on the one hand, on the other hand” so much they start sympathizing with Harry Truman, who jokingly wished for one-handed advisers.</p><p>“Without good evidence, doctors say ‘O.K., you decide,’” Dr. Terri Fried, professor of medicine at Yale and a geriatrician at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, told me. “Patients have no idea what to do with that. If we as doctors can’t reason through the decision, how in the world can we expect patients to?” </p><p>Patients and doctors contend with two major forms of uncertainty: uncertainty of evidence and uncertainty of outcome.</p><p>Uncertainty of evidence is an information problem. It’s like putting a quarter into a gumball machine and having no idea how many will come out. Maybe there aren’t good clinical trials; maybe there are trials but they don’t include patients like you; maybe they do include patients like you but not while you’re fighting pneumonia.</p><p>Uncertainty of outcome is a prediction problem. We know five gumballs are coming out: We just don’t know which ones. Let’s say 5 percent of patients like you will have a stroke this year. Are you the 5 percent or the 95 percent?</p><p>“Most clinicians want much more guidance, especially on how to communicate uncertainty without seeming like they don’t know what they’re doing,” said Dr. Mary Politi, an associate professor at the Washington University School of Medicine. “They feel comfortable talking about benefits, but not risks. Patients feel misled when bad things happen.”</p><p>Doctors typically recommend for or against treatment by dividing a continuum of risk into categories that trip a switch: a statin when you reach a 7.5 percent risk of a heart attack, a blood thinner when you’re at 2 percent risk of a stroke. </p><p>We’re less well trained to explore how a patient’s fears and values intersect with the available evidence. Maybe the inconvenience of daily pills makes a 10 percent risk of a heart attack acceptable to one patient, while a loved one’s recent illness makes a 1 percent risk of a stroke unacceptable to another.</p><p>What’s certain is that uncertainty will always be with us. When wading through medicine’s expansive gray zones, patients could use a guide. Will they get one?</p>

    1 April 17, 2018

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