Watch James Comey's first interview since President Trump fired him

James Comey is breaking his long silence and describing his interactions with President Donald Trump before he was abruptly fired last year.

The former FBI director is sharing his story with ABC News ahead of the April 17 release of his book "A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership."

In an exclusive interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos, James Comey describes having to talk to the then-president-elect about allegations Trump was involved with prostitutes in Moscow.

Comey says he became uncomfortable when his boss, then Attorney General Loretta Lynch, asked him to describe the Clinton email investigation as a "matter."

Comey tells ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that the president said to him, "I expect loyalty, I need loyalty" during a private, one-on-one dinner at the White House.

Comey tells ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that President Trump said to him, "[Flynn] is a good guy, I hope you can let it go."

Comey tells ABC News he decided to leak some of his unclassified memos about his meetings with the president after Trump tweeted about possible "tapes."

In his book, "A Higher Loyalty," Comey writes President Trump is "untethered to the truth" and tells ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that Trump is "morally unfit to be president."

 

April 16, 2018

Sources: ABC News

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    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p> November 8, 2011: Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. &nbsp;(AP) </p><p>Former Senate&nbsp;Majority Leader Harry Reid is currently being treated for pancreatic cancer at&nbsp;Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. The former Democratic senator from Nevada underwent surgery Monday to remove a tumor from his pancreas, Reid's family confirmed in a statement to Fox News.</p><p>“His doctors caught the problem early during a routine screening and his surgeons are confident that the surgery was a success and that the prognosis for his recovery is good,&quot; the statement adds. </p><p>Reid's family said he'll undergo chemoptherapy as part of his treatment. His surgery was successful and Reid was &quot;in good spirits&quot; and &quot;resting&quot; with his family afterward.</p><p>&quot;He is grateful to his highly skilled team of doctors and to all who have sent and continue to send their love and support,&quot; his family adds.</p><p>Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said he spoke with Reid's family after the operation.</p><p>&quot;Spoken to family and it seems @SenatorReid's operation went well. We are all praying for dear Harry’s speedy recovery,&quot; he tweeted Monday afternoon.</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • Illinois death penalty would be reinstated for mass murderers, cop killers under Gov. Rauner's proposal

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    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p> Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner, a Republican, has proposed bringing back the death penalty in his state for mass murderers and those who kill police officers. &nbsp;(Reuters/Leah Millis) </p><p>Gov. Bruce Rauner proposed Monday reestablishing the death penalty in Illinois for certain violent criminals.</p><p>“There must be a burden of proof where a person is guilty beyond all doubt,” Rauner said. “Guilty beyond any doubt for killing a police officer or committing a mass murder. We then will impose the death penalty in Illinois.”</p><p>In a tweet, Rauner, a Republican, said reinstating the death penalty “shows we have no tolerance for such atrocities in our state.”</p><p>“So many times the person is caught in the act. Or so many times there are multiple witnesses and they’re fleeing the act and there’s no question of who did it,” Rauner said of people who kill police, according to the Sun-Times. “And you know what’s really tragic? Many times the perpetrators are proud of what they did. And there are plenty of cases where there’s no doubt who is guilty and they deserve to give up their life when they take the life of a police officer.”</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • Labour frontbencher clarifies new referendum call

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    1 May 14, 2018
  • Johnson: Firms can still do business with Iran

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    ith penalties after Donald Trump pulled the US out of the nuclear deal.</p><p>Boris Johnson has called on Iran to stick to its nuclear agreement with the UK, France and Germany in a bid to protect companies fearful of being penalised for doing business there.</p><p>Mr Johnson revealed on Monday that he would discuss ways to protect them during a meeting with fellow foreign ministers from France and Germany on Tuesday.</p><p>He said: "What we are going to do tomorrow in Brussels is we are going to have a conversation about what we can do to help UK firms, European firms have some confidence that they can still do business."</p><p>Germany and France joined him in reiterating their commitment to the deal, which restricts Iran's nuclear capabilities in return for the lifting of economic sanctions.</p><p>The Prime Minister had already issued a joint statement with French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel to express their "regret and concern".</p><p>Iran has reacted furiously to the US pulling out of the deal, with supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei accusing Mr Trump of threatening its government and its people.</p><p>Mr Khamenei said that while Iranian officials "want to continue the nuclear deal" with Britain, France and Germany, he "did not trust these countries either".</p><p>He continued: "If you could get guarantees from them in such a way that they can be trusted, no problem then you can continue.</p><p>"If you cannot get such a strong guarantee from them, and I see it very unlikely that you can, we could not move and continue like this anymore."</p><p>Iranian officials have said they hope Europe will work with them to preserve the deal.</p>

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  • Jowell tributes: achievements and Beckham anecdote

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    with bringing the Olympics to London in 2012.</p><p>Baroness Tessa Jowell has been honoured by MPs as "the embodiment of empathy" after she died of brain cancer over the weekend.</p><p>The former Labour cabinet minister was remembered as "a person first and a politician second" in an emotional session of tributes on Monday.</p><p>Tales of her achievements, including bringing the Olympics to London in 2012, and personal side were shared by politicians from across the parties in Parliament.</p><p>A Tessa Jowell "global symposium" was also announced to bring experts together to help battle brain cancer and government funding for research into the disease was doubled to &#163;40m.</p><p>Leading the tributes, Prime Minister Theresa May called Baroness Jowell's political achievements "outstanding".</p><p>She called her "a person first and a politician second" who "refused to take no for an answer".</p><p>"Baroness Jowell persuaded Tony Blair and the Cabinet, the civil service and ultimately the whole country to get behind the (Olympic) bid," she said.</p><p>Baroness Jowell also had a screensaver on her phone of her and David Beckham hugging after the announcement, the PM added.</p><p>"As she said, you can be a feminist, but still be susceptible to a David Beckham moment."</p><p>Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said Baroness Jowell will be remembered for her "passion, sense of social justice, for her sense of inclusion and sense of fun in dealing with people", adding: "Above all, also the manner of her leaving us."</p><p>"She taught us how to live and I think she also taught us how to die."</p><p>Angela Rayner, Labour's shadow education secretary, added of one of Baroness Jowell's achievements: "When I was a young mum, it was the Sure Start centre that really helped me and my son.</p><p>"And for all that's said and done in this chamber, that is the best that any honourable member can hope to have achieved."</p><p>Sure Start was launched in 1998 to improve childcare, early education, health and family support.</p><p>Harriet Harman, who served with Baroness Jowell in the then-most female British cabinet, added that she "befriended people who were struggling".</p><p>She added: "But Tessa also befriended the powerful in order to get them to back her progressive causes."</p><p>Commons Speaker John Bercow also paid tribute to Baroness Jowell as "the embodiment of empathy, a stellar progressive change-maker and a well of practical compassion without rival".</p><p>He said: "Tessa Jowell was the best of us. I rue her tragic and untimely passing which leaves all of us in this place - and countless others beyond it - infinitely and permanently poorer."</p>

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  • Corey Lewandowski joining Pence team, will focus on midterms and then 2020

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    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>Trump tweets &#x27;mission accomplished&#x27; after joining forces with the U.K. and France to launch strikes in Syria&#x3b; former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski reacts.</p><p>He is joining Vice President Pence’s political action committee, which will enable him to travel with the VP and puts him firmly back in the president’s 2020 reelection orbit, say sources familiar with the move.</p><p>Lewandowski discussed the move with Trump before accepting the offer and is taking the job with the president’s blessing, these sources say.</p><p>By hiring such a high-profile Trump adviser, Pence is also sending a signal that there’s no daylight between him and his boss, despite some media chatter that the PAC could help further his own ambitions if Trump winds up not running again. The Great America Committee is the first such political arm created by a sitting vice president, but can only be used to donate to other campaigns and not to back any future Pence effort.</p><p>An official announcement is expected soon. Lewandowski has been traveling with Pence recently as they discussed the potential job.</p><p>Lewandowski is leaving the pro-Trump group America First Policies, which has served as something of a way station for presidential advisers in transition.</p><p>By working for the nonprofit America First and its fundraising arm, Lewandowski faced certain restrictions on campaign travel and other overt political activity that could be viewed as improper coordination with the Trump team. Since the Pence committee raises and distributes so-called hard money, none of those restrictions apply.</p><p>The move will not only deepen Lewandowski’s ties to Trump’s second-in-command but instantly make him a player in the midterms, a growing source of concern for the president. The Pence committee donated more than $150,000 to Republican congressional candidates in February.</p><p>Trump had discussed the possibility of Lewandowski becoming his chief of staff if John Kelly leaves, as I recently reported. But Lewandowski was reluctant to join the White House, where he has more than his share of detractors, and the Pence job makes that possibility even more remote.</p><p>His new title will do nothing to slow down the&nbsp;Corey&nbsp;media express. The combative co-author of “Let Trump Be Trump” has been fiercely defending the president and attacking Robert Mueller, James Comey, Andrew McCabe and other investigators and detractors. Pence, for his part, recently stirred controversy by telling NBC that it is time for Mueller and his office to wrap up the Russia investigation.</p><p>In recent months, the New Hampshire resident has been the president’s most visible outside supporter on the airwaves, appearing on all three cable networks as well as Sunday shows, often in contentious interviews.</p><p>The latest job change completes a comeback for the controversial operative. Trump fired Lewandowski as his first campaign manager in the spring of 2016, as he was effectively clinching the nomination, after he developed strained relations with the candidate’s family. But as a private businessman and cable warrior, Lewandowski has remained in close touch with his former boss, sometimes visiting him at the White House, after a period in which he and other advisers had their access curtailed by chief of staff John Kelly.</p><p>Trump had talked to Lewandowski about taking a top White House job when Reince Priebus was winding down his tenure as chief of staff. But Lewandowski preferred to remain on the outside and no formal offer was made.</p><p>Lewandowski joined America First last summer, leaving a Washington consulting firm he had co-founded after the company became mired in controversy, and later became the group’s chief strategist.</p><p>America First has been undergoing something of an exodus. Brad Parscale recently left the group when Trump tapped him to manage his reelection effort. Katrina Pierson, a prominent Trump spokeswoman in 2016, resigned to join the campaign as well.</p><p>But the organization and its political fundraising arm raised more than $13 million in the first quarter of the year.&nbsp;</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • May and Corbyn lead MPs' tributes to Tessa Jowell

    May and Corbyn lead MPs' tributes to Tessa Jowell

    minister who died of brain cancer at the weekend</p><p>The prime minister described her as “a most extraordinary politician, colleague and campaigner”, adding that MPs were honoured to have shared the chamber with her. </p><p>May, who has announced that funding for brain cancer research would be doubled and better diagnostic tests rolled out to all NHS hospitals in tribute, said the former Labour cabinet minister’s dignity and courage were “as humbling as they were inspirational”, adding: “Even at what must have been some of her most difficult moments, her compassion for others shone through.”</p><p>“I think she will be remembered for her passion, for her sense of social justice, for her sense of inclusion and her sense of fun in dealing with people,” he said. </p><p>John Bercow, the Speaker, told MPs: “The embodiment of empathy, a stellar progressive change-maker and a well of practical compassion without rival: Tessa Jowell was the best of us. </p><p>“I rue her tragic and untimely passing which leaves all of us in this place – and countless others beyond it – infinitely and permanently poorer. May Tessa rest in peace.”</p><p>Harman, whose Peckham constituency neighboured Jowell’s seat, added: “She had a unique personal style, she befriended people who were struggling, who were having difficulties, who were powerless who she felt she could support, but she also befriended the powerful in order to get them to back her progressive causes.</p><p>“She was no softy though, everybody said – quite rightly – how charming and nice she was, but there was steel behind those clear blue eyes.” </p><p>The Labour backbencher Peter Kyle shared Jowell’s description of a meeting with Tony Blair at which she tried to persuade him to back the Olympics. </p><p>“At the end of the meeting she turned to him and asked: ‘Do you want to be the prime minister who had the Olympics within your grasp but who turned away?’. That to me was Tessa, because she had learned to weaponise the male ego.</p><p>“That somebody could have an Olympic-sized vision, make it happen, yet do so leaving nothing but a trail of love and laughter is a modern day political miracle. For those of us who knew her, she was that miracle.” </p><p>Tory MP Hugo Swire, who shadowed Jowell when she was culture secretary, told MPs: “She embodied the best in a minister who goes about their business trying to do what they believe is the best interests of the country, not of the party.”</p><p>“She was a people-focused politician, she was a feminist and she showed awesome courage all the way through her life, but particularly in her last year,” she said. </p><p>MPs also described how Jowell was, in Hodge’s words, the “go-to person” on style in parliament, with Labour’s Mary Creagh saying she “knew how to rock a frock” and others praising her eye for fashion. </p><p>The Birmingham MP Liam Byrne added that Jowell had one of the “best political satnavs in the business”, adding: “She knew that if you hit a road block, you hadn’t reached the end of the road, you just had to find your way round it.”</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • 'Sex and the City' star boasts Cuomo being dragged to the left by 'The Cynthia Effect'

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    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p> Gov. Andrew Cuomo, left, is facing off against "Sex and the City" star Cynthia Nixon, right, in the upcoming New York primary. &nbsp;(AP) </p><p>Actress and activist Cynthia Nixon faces a steep climb to unseat Andrew Cuomo in the upcoming New York gubernatorial primary – but claims she’s already succeeding in pulling the Democratic establishment mainstay to the left as she picks off support from key liberal groups.&nbsp;</p><p>Cuomo, New York’s governor since 2011, is regularly eyed as a possible 2020 presidential candidate. But as he scrambles to respond to the left-wing “Sex and the City” star’s unconventional campaign, the race between the two has seemed to mimic the 2016 Democratic primary – in which the hard-left Bernie Sanders faced off against the establishment juggernaut campaign of Hillary Clinton.</p><p>Like Sanders, Nixon faces an uphill struggle, but there are signs she is making a dent in Cuomo’s New York fortress.</p><p>&#x27;Before this campaign is over, he&rsquo;ll get arrested protesting his own administration.&#x27;</p><p>Known for her role as Miranda Hobbes in “Sex and the City,” Nixon picked up steam after announcing her campaign by focusing on New York City’s subway woes as a way of connecting with voters. Meanwhile, she’s picked up support from a range of left-wing groups, including the influential progressive Working Families Party.</p><p>The Daily Kos gave her their backing recently, scorching Cuomo as a “terrible Democrat.”</p><p>Nixon and her supporters claim to have identified areas where Cuomo is shifting to the left, on everything from pot legalization to restoring voting rights for felons.</p><p>“Before this campaign is over, he’ll get arrested protesting his own administration,” she quipped.</p><p>“You have states that have legalized it now…. It is no longer a question of legal or illegal. It’s legal in Massachusetts. It may be legal in New Jersey. Which means for all intents and purposes it’s going to be here anyway,” he said.</p><p>But Nixon took credit for Cuomo’s openness to legalization.</p><p>“But now at the rate Cuomo is changing, I expect he’ll be rolling a joint in his first campaign ad,” she said last Thursday.</p><p>Cuomo allies have dismissed Nixon’s claims of a left-ward shift by the governor, noting that Cuomo has often been ahead of the progressive curve on issues such as gay marriage, paid family leave, a $15 minimum wage and gun safety -- long before Nixon entered the race.</p><p>Cuomo has also been an opponent of the Trump administration since Day One, and was a vocal opponent of Trump’s travel ban.</p><p>Cuomo’s campaign told Fox News that Cuomo’s “long record of progressive accomplishment is irrefutable.”</p><p>“Any claims otherwise should be seen for what they are: baseless election-year rhetoric,” Cuomo campaign press secretary Abbey Fashouer told Fox News.</p><p>But some experts agree that Cuomo has moved to the left to fend off Nixon.</p><p>“This started when he first faced a primary challenge in 2014,” Susan Del Percio, a Republican strategist who was a special adviser to Cuomo in 2014, told Fox News. “That brought him to the left and this challenge has brought him further to the left, and he’s staking ground with his nemesis [Mayor] Bill de Blasio to be the main progressive in New York.”</p><p>&quot;The reckless and unconstitutional practices ICE is deploying in our communities violate everything we believe in New York and are an assault on our democracy,&quot; Cuomo said. Homan accused Cuomo of “grandstanding.”</p><p>“If Cuomo was really concerned about protecting New York's immigrant communities, then instead of saying he's doing ‘more than any other Governor,’ he would pass the Driver's License Bill and make New York a sanctuary state,” she tweeted.</p><p>“I’m for legalizing marijuana and I like Cynthia Nixon but putting pot shops in our communities is not reparations,” he said.</p><p>Del Percio said Nixon had made an “impressive start” but questioned how much of a challenge she would be to the Democratic behemoth.</p><p>“Given her stumbles on the campaign trail, [Cuomo] should treat her as a serious challenge but I don’t think he has that much to be concerned about,” she said. “The million-dollar question is how much has she raised, and [we] won’t know that until July.”</p><p>But Nixon seems intent on keeping the pressure on Cuomo and maintaining her high-profile campaign ahead of the Sept. 13 state primary -- including challenging him to a one-on-one debate, “no distractions, and nowhere to hide.”</p><p>This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p>

    1 May 14, 2018
  • What is the farm bill? From food stamps to conservation efforts, a look at the massive legislation

    What is the farm bill? From food stamps to conservation efforts, a look at the massive legislation

    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. All market data delayed 20 minutes.</p><p>SNAP, welfare, and a look at why the Farm Bill is so controversial</p><p>House Republicans are gearing up for their next project: the farm bill.</p><p>From food stamps to conservation issues, the farm bill is a huge piece of legislation that needs to be updated by Congress about every 5 years. 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    1 May 14, 2018
  • Supreme Court to tackle immigration, voting rights, unions: A look at major cases on justices' agenda

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    or redistributed. &copy;2018 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. 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    1 May 14, 2018

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