Meghan Marke's one travel essential revealed: hand sanitiser

The former Suits star explained that she always sprays or wipes down surfaces around her when she travels on a plane, even though it does make her look 'a little odd' to fellow commuters.

'I'm no germophobe, but when I get on a plane I always use some quick hand wipes or a travel sanitiser spray to wipe it all down: that includes the little TV, the service tray, and all the buttons around your seat,' she said.

'Sure, the person next to you may give you a side eye, but at the end of the flight, you'll be the one whistling Dixie with nary a sniffle.'

With a packet of wipes costing as little as £1 Meghan's top travel tip is a purse-friendly option for those who don't have an A-list budget.

Avoiding germs: Meghan Markle has revealed that hand sanitiser is the one product she does not travel without, adding: 'I'm no germophobe- you don't want to be the Dixie with a sniffle!'

Additionally Meghan advised fellow travellers to drink plenty of water when flying.

'Always travel with a high strain probiotic, and hydrate like you're dying of thirst – because even if you're not, for your body – the thirst is real', she wrote.

Meghan, who was previously based in LA, was an expert traveller due to her busy schedule filming law drama Suits in Canada. 

And stepping into her new role as wife to Prince Harry, Meghan will certainly have an array of further engagements to keep her travelling schedule busy. 

The Suits actress, who is due to marry Prince Harry in May, reveals she sprays down surfaces around her when she travels on a plane, though she admits it can make her look 'a little odd' to fellow commuters

Just last week she made her first official joint appearance alongside future brother and sister-in-law Prince William and Kate Middleton. 

The two couples took part in the first annual Royal Foundation Forum in London on Wednesday February 28. 

It was the first time Meghan has been seen in public with the Duchess of Cambridge since they attended Christmas Day service at Sandringham together.

Bride-to-be Ms Markle will formally become the fourth patron of The Royal Foundation following her high-profile wedding to Harry on May 19. 

Last week she made her first official joint appearance alongside future brother and sister-in-law Prince William and Kate Middleton

On Friday Prince Harry and Meghan invited 2,640 people to the grounds of Windsor Castle to celebrate their wedding.

The guests, who will come from all corners of the United Kingdom, will be able to watch the arrival of the bride and groom and be in a prime location to see their carriage procession after the ceremony.

'Prince Harry and Ms. Meghan Markle have said they want their Wedding Day to be shaped so as to allow members of the public to feel part of the celebrations too,' Kensington Palace said in a statement.

'This wedding, like all weddings, will be a moment of fun and joy that will reflect the characters and values of the Bride and Groom.'

The couple will marry at noon in St. George's Chapel, the 15th century church on the grounds of Windsor Castle - long the backdrop of choice for royal occasions. 

The couple will marry at noon on May 19 in St. George's Chapel, the 15th century church on the grounds of Windsor Castle - long the backdrop of choice for royal occasions

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?

Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.

Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?

We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.

Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group

 

March 04, 2018

Sources: Daily Mail

Related news

  • Banker who bought 175ft Gothic tower for £425,000 now hopes to make £3.6m raffling it off

    Banker who bought 175ft Gothic tower for £425,000 now hopes to make £3.6m raffling it off

    n a prize competition which could net its owner £3.6 million. </p><p>Hadlow Tower, which stands at 175ft, in Tonbridge, Kent, was put on the market earlier this year for £2million by owner Christian Tym.</p><p>The Grade I-listed property, which has previously had more than £3million of public money spent on it, was purchased by Mr Tym for £425,000.  </p><p>Hadlow Tower (pictured) which stands at 175ft, in Tonbridge, Kent, was put on the market earlier this year for £2million by owner Christian Tym</p><p>Christian Tym (pictured cooking a BBQ) is the owner of Hadlow Tower and has now launched a prize competition to hand over the property</p><p>Long curtains hang in one of the four bedrooms in the tower, which is tucked away at the bottom of a set of wooden steps</p><p>The stunning dining room in the tower is flawlessly furnished with an eight-seat table in the centre of the room and a piano under an alcove in the corner</p><p>The tower received a £2.6 million grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund in 1997.</p><p>The Save Hadlow Tower Action group poured an additional £50,000 into the restoration.</p><p>And Historic England have also contributed to the restoration of the building. </p><p>But some of the finer details of the prize have upset locals who have branded it a 'money making scheme.'</p><p>For example, Mr Tym, will only hand over the property if he sells 800,000 tickets, which would net him approximately £3.6 million.</p><p>In order to sell the tower in a competition, Mr Tym had to comply with the law of prize competitions. </p><p>So Mr Tym had to test entrants skill, knowledge and judgement by including a tricky equation.</p><p>Nestled at the foot of a winding modern staircase is a study desk, complete with a vintage desk lamp and freestanding globe</p><p>Inside the living area is an enormous television, a sheepskin rug and leather chairs and footstools. Striking images hang from the bright pink walls</p><p>The striking living room in the eight-storey tower, with a bold fireplace, immaculate wooden floors and a chandelier hanging from the ceiling</p><p>The Save Hadlow Tower Action Group (SHTAG) worked hard to ensure the building was restored to its former glory after the 1987 storm</p><p>The Save Hadlow Tower Action Group (SHTAG) worked tirelessly for years to refurbish the tower after it was damaged in the great storm of 1987.</p><p>Caroline Anderson, former chair of the SHTAG, said: 'This iconic Grade 1 listed monument is now being raffled (read the Ts and Cs carefully) and will most probably not finish up someone's hands whilst the owner gets rich'</p><p>Lotteries (which includes, raffles, sweepstakes and some competitions) are a form of gambling and so are subject to laws about who can run them and what they are for, and are regulated by the Gambling Commission</p><p>Lotteries can only be promoted for good caused and cannot be promoted for commercial gain.</p><p>It is a criminal offence under the Gambling Act to promote an unlawful lottery.</p><p>But prize draws and free draws are free from control under the Gambling Act 2005. </p><p>A genuine prize competition is one where the outcome is determined by the application of skill, judgement or knowledge.</p><p>The Gambling Commission monitors the boundary between prize competitions, free draws and lotteries.</p><p>'I doubt whether any of us would have given our time freely and continuously if we had known it would come to this.'</p><p>There are additional concerns a new prospective owner might be able to buyout the legal covenant on the building, which stipulates the tower must remain accessible to the public for 28 days a year.</p><p>Mr Tym has denied he is a 'rich man trying to sell a property' and that five per cent of the proceeds of the competition will go to charity. </p><p>Hadlow Tower, which is 6ft taller than Nelson's column, was erected by the wealthy merchant and land owner Walter Barton May in 1838 in the grounds of Hadlow Castle in Tonbridge, Kent.</p><p>Rumours circulated that Mr May used his gigantic creation as a vantage point for snooping on his former wife, who ran off with a local farmer.</p><p>Used as a look out during World War Two, the tower was bought up by Royal painter Bernard Hailstone.</p><p>However, it was badly damaged in the Great Storm of 1987 and became derelict before a compulsory purchase order was issued by the local council in 2010.</p><p>At that time, Hadlow Tower was listed on the World Monument Fund's 100 most endangered historic buildings in the world. </p><p>It was sold to the Vivat Trust, a charity that preserves historic buildings, for the paltry sum of £1.</p><p>A renovation completed in 2013 paid for by the National Heritage Lottery Fund and English Heritage transformed Hadlow Tower into a state of the art home.</p><p>The property was rented by Vivat as holiday accommodation until they went into liquidation and the present owner, Christian Tym, purchased it for £425,000. </p><p>Surely there must be a clause in him selling it an...</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Meghan Markle’s father texts her every day to but she never replies

    Meghan Markle’s father texts her every day to but she never replies

    kle said: 'She has always been a very controlling person and that is part of her nature - but she has never been rude. She has always been in charge'.</p><p>The 74-year-old, who last spoke to the Duchess of Sussex on the eve of her wedding in May, claims he sends her text messages 'every day' and has also sent letters to Kensington Palace.</p><p>He said: 'I've been ghosted. I'm not sure why it's happening. I love my daughter very much. I wish she would reach out, send me a text, anything. There has to be a place for me. I'm her father'.</p><p>And in a message of reconciliation for his estranged daughter, who is believed to be around five months pregnant, Mr Markle stared down the camera and said: 'I love you very much. I would like to hear from you. Whatever difficulties we've had I hope we can work through them. We're family'.</p><p>Thomas Markle (pictured today) used an unpaid interview with GMB to again beg his daughter Meghan to stop ignoring his texts and letters and 'reach out'</p><p>Meghan's father hopes that the Queen might intervene to heal his fractured relationship with his daughter and son in law (pictured at the The Royal Variety Performance in November)</p><p>In an extraordinary and wide-ranging interview, the retired Hollywood lighting engineer told GMB:</p><p>Meghan, pictured a week ago at The Fashion Awards 2018, is pregnant with her first child but has cut off contact with her father</p><p>Meghan cut off contact with her father after he failed to walk her down the aisle and has rebuffed all his attempts to make contact with her since then.  </p><p>But Mr Markle hopes the birth of her child will break down that 'barrier', adding: 'I think she will make a great mum and maybe things will soften a bit and we will get back in contact'.</p><p>He added: 'I'm certainly hoping that everything goes well that they produce a beautiful baby. I hope I'll get to see a little Meghan or a little Harry'. </p><p>Mr Markle has said that this will be his first Christmas without a card, call or visit from his beloved youngest child, who will spend it with the Queen at Sandringham.</p><p>Thomas Markle said he hopes Her Majesty will help him and said: 'I would be grateful for anything she can do.</p><p>'I would think she would want to resolve any family problems. All families, royal or not, need to be together, especially in the holidays'. </p><p>Speaking from San Diego, Mr Markle said the rift 'can't continue forever' and he would keep trying to connect with his daughter.</p><p>He went on: 'I don't plan to be silent for the rest of my life. I love my daughter very much and she has to know that, and I would really appreciate if she would call me, just reach out to me.</p><p>'There has to be a place for me. I'm here, she knows it ... I need her to reach back to me.'</p><p>Thomas Markle said he was not paid to appear on breakfast TV in the UK because he just wants Meghan to hear his message of reconciliation</p><p>Mr Markle told Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid that his daughter is 'controlling' - Piers Morgan says he believes Princess Diana would not have let the row get this far</p><p>There&#39;s just one week to go until the big day, but it&#39;s not too late to pick up a new Christmas dress.</p><p>Susanna Reid showed us how it&#39;s done on Good Morning Britain today, wearing a floral print velvet number with a high neck and flattering floaty sleeves. It&#39;s from Oasis and it&#39;s pretty much perfect for going from office to evening! </p><p>Click (right) to buy yours now. Stylist Debbie Harper added colour pop heels from H&amp;M to Susanna&#39;s look, but you could totally go for ankle boots and black tights too. </p><p>Or show your soft side this festive season in one of the similar dresses from our edit below. Free People and Asos have got our favourites!</p><p>Questioned by Piers Morgan, Mr Markle denied Meghan had a tendency to dump people if she had no use for them, saying: 'That's really not a character trait. She's always been very polite to everyone, never been rude to anyone. I don't know what's really happening right now.'</p><p>Piers Morgan also made a plea for his former friend Meghan Markle to heal the rift with her father Thomas.</p><p>The GMB host has repeatedly lashed out at the former Suits star and accused her of 'acting her way to the top' and 'ghosting' him after she met Prince Harry. </p><p>As he interviewed her father today Mr Morgan said: 'If Meghan is watching this and I feel she will because she will be intrigued.</p><p>'Come on Meghan. This is your dad and it's Christmas.</p><p>'I feel really sad about this and I hope it can be resolved because the longer it goes on the worse it can get.'</p><p>He also said he did not believe this row would be allowed to continue if Princess Diana was still alive. </p><p>Mr Markle said: 'My daughter lived with me from the age of 11 all through middle school and high school until she went off to college. We're very close.</p><p>'What's happened, I'm not sure. I'd love to talk about it. I think it comes back to the fact that reporters pick up on interviews I've done and write their own stories and tell lies.'</p><p>He added: 'If they are believing that, that's unfortunate. They've always told me not to believe anything.'</p><p>Mr Markle has been cut off by his daughter and new son in law and said recently: 'Murderers are not punished like I've been'.  </p><p>Mr Markle appeared on GMB over the summer where the recluse claimed that Harry had said he was 'open' to Brexit and that people needed to 'give Trump a chance'. </p><p>He also said that Meghan kept the fact that she was dating Harry secret at first, asking her father to refer to him by the codename 'H', and that Harry had already popped the question to his daughter by the time he asked for her hand in marriage by phone and when he did, Meghan was also on the line. </p><p>He said he gave his permission for the couple to wed as long as Harry promised never to 'raise his hand' against his daughter and was 'grateful' to Charles for stepping in when he was forced to pull out of giving his daughter away due to heart surgery, but admitted he felt jealous. </p><p>Kensington Palace declined to comment on the interview or the astonishing claims, but there is little doubt that the new Duke and Duchess of Sussex have again been left humiliated by the continuing Markle family soap opera.</p><p>Good Morning Britain presenter Piers Morgan confirmed that Meghan's father had pocketed 'a few thousand pounds' but insisted his 'ultimate motive was not money'.</p><p>Prince Harry and Meghan Markle stand on the steps of St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle. Thomas Markle did not walk his daughter down the aisle at her wedding</p><p>Meghan and her mother, Doria, remain close and is expected to move to London to help care for her first grandchild</p><p>He claimed Mr Markle had turned down significantly higher offers from the US media but chose the British programme as he wanted the 'proper chance' to put across his 'side of the story'. </p><p>Mr Markle's decision to 'sell out' will be frustrating for palace officials who, after a dramatic run-up to the royal wedding, managed to pull off an extremely successful global event and had no doubt hoped to see the back of any further Markle family revelations.</p><p>The fact that Mr Markle chose not to discuss the interview beforehand with his daughter is likely to be seen by many as suggesting their relationship is fractured in the extreme.</p><p>Royal sources have maintained, however, they have done everything they can to help and guide Mr Markle, and say he is a proud man who finds it difficult to accept assistance from his daughter.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • TV actress killed herself after her mother died from breast cancer

    TV actress killed herself after her mother died from breast cancer

    d 'wanted to feel the hurt' in the months after her mother passed away</p><p>A young actress took her own life when she was unable to come to terms with losing her mother to breast cancer. </p><p>Cady Stewart lived with her mother Sharon and the pair 'relied on one another' and had a 'close and loving bond', an inquest heard. </p><p>But Ms Stewart was overcome with grief when her mother died in November last year following a battle with cancer.</p><p>Shortly afterwards, Cady was hospitalised when she took an overdose saying she 'needed to be with her mum.' </p><p>Friends said the 33-year-old 'didn't want to feel happy' and 'wanted to feel the hurt' in the months that followed. </p><p>On June 2, Ms Stewart, from Droylsden in Greater Manchester, wrote a note asking friends to look after her Pomeranian dog Bella before taking a lethal overdose of drugs.</p><p>She was found at her home by a friend when she failed to answer texts and Facebook messages about meeting for lunch. </p><p>Ms Stewart, who was an extra in TV shows and had jobs in hairdressing and retail, had stockpiled her mother's medication and anti-depressant tablets, the inquest heard.  </p><p>Cady Stewart and her mother had a 'close and loving bond' and relied on one another, an inquest heard</p><p>Cady lived with her mother Sharon (pictured together), and was unable to come to terms with losing her</p><p>In a statement her cousin Gemma Johnson said: 'Her dad wasn't involved with her growing up. He did get in touch on Facebook and when I asked if she was going to do anything about it, she said no because he hadn't been around for her her whole life.</p><p>'She lived with her mum and spent a lot of time with her grandmother. They had a lot of sleepovers together. We were a close family growing up, I have quite happy memories of her and she was like a sister to me.</p><p>'Cady was very close to her Mum, they lived together. She was a beautiful kind-hearted girl who was quite quiet.'</p><p>Ms Johnson said Cady struggled to cope when her mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer.  </p><p>Ms Johnson added: 'She struggled to cope without her. Her friends noticed that she hadn't been eating and was losing weight. She was concerned about finances.</p><p>'I found out Cady passed away when I was on holiday, her friends found her. She didn't want to feel happy, she wanted to feel the hurt.'</p><p>Cady was found dead in her home after taking an overdose of drugs, including her mother's medication </p><p>Cady was described as a 'beautiful kind-hearted girl' who was simply overcome with grief </p><p>Close friend Lisa Whitworth who found Cady, told the inquest how she found Cady on June 2 this year. </p><p>She said in a statement: 'We went round to her house and saw Bella, her dog, in the living room downstairs, which was strange as she never left Cady's side.</p><p>'There was a note on the door telling us to look after her. We both went upstairs and Cady was on the bed. We were advised by the ambulance to perform CPR, but sadly she passed away.</p><p>'We supported Cady since the passing of her mum. Cady had previously overdosed on morphine with belonged to her mum. She just couldn't cope due to the passing of her mum.' </p><p>Pathologist Dr Vicki Howarth concluded Cady died after overdosing on a combination of drugs.  </p><p>Cady was found at her home in Manchester in June this year </p><p>Det Insp David Loughlin said a note was left in Cady's home asking friends to look after her dog, alongside a pad where she had written her 'mood and her intentions.' </p><p>Cady's GP Dr Rajesh Gulati told the inquest he saw over over several months, during which time her grief intensified. </p><p>He added: 'She did say to me that she did feel her life was worth living and she wanted to try on behalf of her mum. </p><p>'She had been offered grief counselling but she didn't want to go there. There was nothing to suggest she wasn't taking the medication.'</p><p>Recording a conclusion of suicide, Coroner Alison Mutch said: 'It's very clear from the evidence that Cady and her mother had a very close and loving bond.</p><p>'Cady relied on her mum and her mum relied on Cady. Cady had been her mother's primary carer and it is clear her death was a devastating blow. This was shown by the fact she made an attempt to take her own life.</p><p>'She was acting on impulse and there was no intention of self-harm. She told nurses she wanted to live on in her mums memory. </p><p>'But it is clear from the evidence I have heard that she was good at hiding how she was feeling from her friends, family and her GP.</p><p>'It is clear from the sheer volume of drugs that she had stockpiled them. I am satisfied that at the time of death she did intend to take her own life and she knew of the consequences.' </p><p>A report to prevent future deaths in relation to the restriction of opioid drugs in the community for palliative care was issued to the Stockport Clinical Commissioning Group.  </p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Tour firm cancels Christmas trips to Disneyland Paris at last minute

    Tour firm cancels Christmas trips to Disneyland Paris at last minute

    h company cancelled a once-in-a-lifetime holiday to Disneyland Paris just two days before they were due to leave.</p><p>Angry parents say their requests for a refund from several days out organised and then scrapped by Day Trips Newport have been ignored by the tour operator.</p><p>The firm claims to organise coach trips to Disneyland, the Harry Potter Studio Tour, Chessington World of Adventures and several other British zoos and theme parks.</p><p> Father-of-five Darren Small, 39, pictured with his family, paid around £2,500 in installments over the last year to take his family to Disneyland Paris as a pre-Christmas treat</p><p>But it has been inundated with complaints from furious parents who claim trips have been cancelled at the last minute and their requests for a refund are being ignored. </p><p>Some even claim they have been blocked by the Welsh company's owners on Facebook after sending them messages to ask for their money back.</p><p>Father-of-five Darren Small, 39, from Newport, paid around £2,500 in instalments over the last year to take his family to Disneyland Paris as a pre-Christmas treat.</p><p>But he began to get suspicious when his requests for a confirmation of their departure time were ignored.</p><p>A reply from travel company Day Trips Newport to Mr Small following his complaint</p><p>The booking confirmation sent by Day Trips Newport to Mr Small ahead of the planned trip</p><p>He said: 'We contacted Disney's Hotel Santa Fe, where we were meant to stay, but there was no record of our name at all. We went in to panic mode then.'</p><p>After repeatedly sending messages to the holiday organisers he was then told the trip, which was due to take place over last weekend, was no longer going ahead.</p><p>Mr Small said his children have been left devastated by the news, particularly as the holiday was part of their Christmas present.</p><p>The father, who confirmed he has contacted the police, added: 'One of my daughters, who is six, has autism. </p><p>'She can't understand why we are not going to Disneyland. I just want people to know about the situation. They (Day Trips Newport) can't do this to families.' </p><p>And the Small family are not the only ones to be let down by the company. Dozens of angry parents have taken to the firm's Facebook page to rant about their treatment.</p><p>Louise Patrick wrote: 'Why ain't you answering any of us? You have blocked me and my partner on messenger also! I want a refund! I'm fuming.'</p><p>Angela Bolwell said: 'Shocking this is same happened to myself and my very upset family... Chessington for Halloween last year!'</p><p>Others only found out their trips were cancelled after seeing others take to Facebook to complain.</p><p>The families had been looking forward to visiting Disneyland Paris (file picture)</p><p>Tom Buckley said: 'Why have they not contacted everyone?! I'm fuming! My wife is in absolute bits. No explanation, no message to say what they are going to do about it!'</p><p>Emily Tennant added: 'Absolutely disgusting... My nephew and niece are absolutely gutted that they won't be going to Santa safari, not to mention when asking for a refund my friend was blocked on Messenger. </p><p>'She tried calling then suddenly the number was removed from the page. Everyone should be paid back in full straight away regardless of how little or how much they spent.</p><p>'People don't always have money to spare and I know my friend planned this as part of her kids' Christmas present. If you never paid in full for the trip then getting a refund ASAP shouldn't be an issue.'</p><p>Despite the company apparently running trips for at least a year, it was only registered on Companies House by owner Matthew Neale in August of this year.</p><p>A garbled message posted on the Day Trips Newport Facebook page by the owners last Thursday said: 'It has come to our attention that some people have not paid in full for upcoming trips. Any one that has not paid in full would not be entittled [sic] to come on the trip. This includes people from Xmas trips.</p><p>'Whilst we appreciate certain things get prioritised at this time of the year, as you would appreciate having 19 people not pay for a trip in full is an expense that could not be covered. I have previously said I do not do these trips for the money. I work full time and have three jobs to support my family.</p><p>'It was purely a way of visiting places and making them accessible to other people.'</p><p>A Gwent Police spokesman said: 'At approximately 6.25pm on December 12, 2018, we received an allegation of fraud from a member of the public in the Newport area. </p><p>'Arrangements were made for an officer to meet with the caller to discuss the report.'</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Care home staff not paid before Christmas are angry over boss's Instagram boasts

    Care home staff not paid before Christmas are angry over boss's Instagram boasts

    efore Christmas, before posting photos of expensive purchases online</p><p>The boss of a care home which couldn't pay its staff has been slammed for posting photos online boasting of her expensive shopping trips.</p><p>Claire Fryer is the managing director of the company which runs Radcliffe Gardens Nursing Home in Pudsey, West Yorkshire.</p><p>All of the nursing homes residents moved out in recent months after a damning report by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) revealed concerns over medicine management and fire safety.</p><p>Workers say matters have been made worse by Ms Fryer's Instagram posts, in which she shows off her expensive purchases.</p><p>She boasted that she was out shopping for a new winter coat last month, before posting a photo of a Liberty advent calendar, which is filled with £600-worth of beauty products.</p><p>Mrs Fryer angered unpaid staff by posting photos from her shopping trips online</p><p>Mrs Fryer, who lives in a £1.4million home, previously emailed staff saying wages would not be given their wages due to 'financial difficulties'.</p><p>Lee Naylor, who works as a cook at Radcliffe Gardens, said staff were frantic with worry but their pleas had 'fallen on deaf ears'.</p><p>She said: 'I texted Mrs Fryer asking when to expect my wages as my mortgage is due tomorrow. She told me I wouldn't be getting paid until at least mid-January.</p><p>'The Liberty advent calendar she's bragging about cost more than what my mortgage is. I explained to her I had no way of paying it.</p><p>'I have no savings. It's cruel how she is treating the staff and residents. Today should have been payday, and a bumper payday at that.</p><p>'Bearing in mind we have been short staffed and staff have had to work extra hours and have gone above and beyond our roles.</p><p>'All of us have families and for some this job is their only source of income. Two weeks before Christmas and we have no wage and no job.'</p><p>She also posted a photo of a Liberty beauty products advent calendar, worth around £195</p><p>The wages blow came after the home was placed in special measures and 20 residents were warned they would have to leave as it had been issued with a 'notice of intended closure'.</p><p>The email to staff read: 'Due to the fact that all residents have been found alternative care placements, the business has been disrupted unexpectedly and is facing serious financial issues.</p><p>'We are doing all we can, however as a small family business and with the recent investments, there is no surplus funds available. A payment was expected by December 7 for the continued service.</p><p>'This payment hasn't been received and the business is not expecting any further payments.'</p><p>Mrs Fryer's Alder Health Group, which is registered in Preston, Lancs., owns and operates Radcliffe Gardens Nursing Home.</p><p>The troubled care home had been put into special measures by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in June.</p><p>A damning report by the CQC exposed a number of concerns, regarding fire safety, medicine management, and the absence of a registered manager on site.</p><p>Staff who work at the Radcliffe Gardens Nursing Home in West Yorkshire have gone unpaid</p><p>The home was found to be in breach of regulations and was issued with a 'notice of intended closure'.</p><p>Concerned social workers took urgent action in November and told the families of all 20 residents they would have to leave.</p><p>Mrs Fryer appealed to the care tribunal services and a review hearing date has been set for March 2019, but many people had already removed their relatives from the home.</p><p>Mrs Fryer told staff the action taken by Leeds City Council caused her company serious financial issues and left her unable to pay their wages.</p><p>As a result, staff were told that they wouldn't be paid until at least mid-January 2019, but Leeds City Council disputed Mrs Fryer's claims that the company has not been paid.</p><p>A spokesman said: 'Leeds City Council has rigorously checked to ensure that all fees due to be paid in respect of Radcliffe Gardens Nursing Homes by the council have been paid. There is no evidence of overdue payments or money owed.</p><p>'We have done our best to support staff from the home, signposting them to organisations who can offer support in these circumstances.'</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Bedale teenager Jodie Bowers bullied for severe overbite gets surgery

    Bedale teenager Jodie Bowers bullied for severe overbite gets surgery

    having severe overbite says she is 'loving life' after corrective surgery.</p><p>Jodie Bowers, of Bedale, North Yorkshire, was 13 when medics realised her bottom jaw was 11mm further back than her top one. </p><p>She was promised an operation but had to wait six years until she stopped growing before she was given the green light. </p><p>During the agonising wait, she was bombarded with abusive messages and even attacked on a night out.</p><p>She was forced to call the police on three occasions and had to start taking antidepressants because the bullies were making her life hell.</p><p>But now after going under the knife, Jodie, 19, says surgery has transformed her confidence.</p><p>Jodie Bowers, of Bedale, North Yorkshire, was 13 when medics realised her bottom jaw was 11mm further back than her top one. She had to endure a six-year wait before she was ready for surgery. The 19-year-old is pictured before left and after right </p><p>During the agonising wait, she was bombarded with abusive messages and even attacked on a night out</p><p>Bullies flooded the teenager with messages and shared edited pictures of her </p><p>She said: 'I was counting the days down until my operation. I feel absolutely incredible now. I am just loving life.</p><p>'Life is so much better, I'm going out more and I'm happy to speak for myself.</p><p>'The main thing is that I'll take photos of my side before which I never would have done before. Now I just can't wait to get out there and live my life.'</p><p>Recently surgeons at James Cook Hospital in Middlesbrough, split her jaw apart before moving each piece into a new position.</p><p>Although initially she couldn't see the results due to swelling and bruising, when Jodie first saw her reflection she burst into tears of joy. </p><p>Jodie was promised an operation at 13 but had to wait six years until she stopped growing before she was given the green light (pictured in hospital straight afterwards) </p><p>Although initially she couldn't see the results due to swelling and bruising, when Jodie first saw her reflection she burst into tears of joy</p><p>She said: 'I was about 13 years old when my dentist noticed something was wrong.</p><p>'They referred me to the hospital where I had loads of X-rays and they came to the conclusion that surgery was the best option.</p><p>'But you have to wait until you stop developing so I had to wait until I was older.</p><p>'I never thought I was pretty and it didn't matter what anyone said, I just felt awful.'</p><p>Jodie, of Bedale, North Yorkshire, spent her teenage years suffering from low confidence and banned her friends from taking photos of her sideways, as it showed off her profile.</p><p>She said: 'My mouth was really crowded so I had six teeth taken out and it caused me to snore.</p><p>'I've always had to eat everything with a knife and fork, even pizza, as I needed to chop it up really small.</p><p>'But a lot of it was about the mental suffering. It caused me to have really bad social anxiety.</p><p>'I used to have a lot of panic attacks and I hated having to be the centre of attention.'</p><p>Recovery: Jodie Bowers is pictured with large bruises on her face as a result of the surgery </p><p>She admits that it stopped her from putting herself out there and that she dreaded having to speak in public.</p><p>She said: 'I was very lucky that I went to a small school and everyone supported me.</p><p>'I think I was very lucky to have that as other people definitely weren't as understanding.</p><p>She said: 'Life is so much better, I'm going out more and I'm happy to speak for myself.'</p><p>'When I was about 16 years old, I was added to a group chat on Facebook and it was just full of lads making fun of me.</p><p>'They were swapping photos of me and making fun of how I look. And one of them added me in so I could see it.</p><p>'I got the police involved and they then had to apologise to me but I've had them blocked since.</p><p>'When stuff like that happened, I would sit there and think how could anyone do something like that to someone else?</p><p>'Another time I went on a night out in Darlington and a girl swung at me.</p><p>'We were in the toilets and she made a mean comment about my jaw so I burst into tears.</p><p>'Then she started getting really angry and tried to hit me so I had to get the bouncers to escort her out as she was going crazy about it.</p><p>'And on a day to day basis, you'd notice people staring or I'd pick up on comments being made.</p><p>'Looking back now, I didn't really cope with it. Something like that would make me go home and cry.</p><p>'I got put on medication and it consumed my life. The first thing everyone saw of me was my chin.</p><p>'My mum and dad were so supportive and didn't hesitate to get the police involved.'     </p><p>Sam Cheatle, head of wellbeing services at Changing Faces, a charity that campaigns for people with facial disfigurements, said negative remarks were common.</p><p>She said: 'Having a visible difference in a society where there is such pressure to look a certain way can be extremely difficult.</p><p>'Changing Faces provides counselling, support networks and skin camouflage services for anyone with a condition which affects the appearance of their face or body.</p><p>'The people we support often tell us about their experiences of isolation, anxiety and negative attitudes from others, such as staring and hurtful comments.'</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Bath man Tom Duckworth 24 build mobile home out of old Army lorry

    Bath man Tom Duckworth 24 build mobile home out of old Army lorry

    iny mobile home is now living rent and bills free at the age of 24.</p><p>Tom Duckworth restores vintage cars for a living and decided he wanted to take it a step further and build his own home.</p><p>He chose the Bedford MJ and spent £15,000 and an entire year transforming the old military vehicle into a 72 square foot mobile home for himself.</p><p>Mr Duckworth, originally from Bath, says he wanted to live without paying any unnecessary bills - so decided to install solar panels and a rain collection system to be able to live 'off grid'. </p><p>The truck's military past is ever present with a gun hatch on the roof and army facets visible down the sides. </p><p>But he still has enough room to sleep, cook, wash and relax on the sofa.  </p><p>Tom Duckworth, 24 (pictured on top of his converted army van) spent a year and £15,000 on making a new home for himself by transforming an old Bedford MJ van </p><p>Inisde the 72 square foot mobile home there is enough room for him to relax on the sofa </p><p>Mr Duckworth's £15,000 home also boasts a kitchen space where there is room to cook </p><p>It took Mr Duckworth a year to transform the vehicle into somewhere he could live. Pictured: His workshop </p><p>He said: 'It came from wanting to save money on rent as well as wanting to do something that I had not seen before.</p><p>'Also living off grid was very important to me as well. The lorry has a full solar power system and rain water collection as well.</p><p>'It is good but just a bit too small for two people. It gives me so much freedom from bills as well as the ability to travel.</p><p>'When I was designing the lorry house, I wanted to have the possibility of having a stealth camper by putting the original canvas over the steel frame to make it look like an old army lorry again. </p><p>'This is one of the reasons that I didn't build the house over the cab.</p><p>'As well as this, there is a gun turret/access hatch on the top of the cab. I loved this feature so much it changed the whole design of the house.' </p><p>Tom Duckworth, originally from Bath, Somerset, is pictured with his girlfriend </p><p>Mr Duckworth started out by installing a steel frame on the back end of the lorry (pictured at different stages, left and right) </p><p>The coachbuilder says he wanted to live without paying any unnecessary bills - so decided to install solar panels and a rain collection system to be able to live 'off grid</p><p>Mr Duckworth started out by installing a steel frame on the back end of the lorry. </p><p>After scouring several building sites, he was able to salvage a number of reclaimed palletes to use as cladding on the exterior walls.</p><p>Although the experience of cutting and shaping the pallets was arduous, he says that it was one of the best decisions they made in the entire project. </p><p>By using reclaimed wood, he was able to save money, but also use the remaining scraps of wood on the home's ceilings and walls. </p><p>The army van home is pictured by the seaside. Mr Duckworth does not have to pay council tax and is free to travel where he wants </p><p>Everything you need: Inside the army van there is an electric cooker (pictured left) and a monsoon shower (right) </p><p>He said of his creation (interior pictured): 'It came from wanting to save money on rent as well as wanting to do something that I had not seen before.'</p><p>Once the cladding was in place, they added on a zintec steel roof, leaving enough space to install solar panels.</p><p>Mr Duckworth has clocked up 4,000 miles in his quirky home so far and hopes to help others achieve their dreams of tiny mobile travel.</p><p>He added: 'The only problem I had was not having much of an idea of how to build a home on a lorry.</p><p>'It was just make it up as I go along but I am hoping to build camper vans and motor homes for people to help them achieve their own off-grid dreams.</p><p>'I would tell people to make sure you have some money to start as it takes more of your life than you could ever think.'</p><p>Mr Duckworth has clocked up 4,000 miles in his quirky home so far and hopes to help others achieve their dreams of tiny mobile travel</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • May joins forces with Boris to condemn Brexit referendum calls

    May joins forces with Boris to condemn Brexit referendum calls

    ther national ballot as a way through the mounting political crisis - thought to include some of her own Cabinet and closest aides.</p><p>In a bid to kill off the prospect, Mrs May will tell MPs it would cause 'irreparable damage' to Britain.</p><p>And the warning has been echoed by Mr Johnson, who insisted anyone backing a fresh referendum was 'out of their minds' and it would create 'feelings of betrayal' among millions of voters.  </p><p>The united front with the former foreign secretary comes amid a desperate scramble to find a way through the Brexit deadlock.</p><p>With seemingly no hope of Mrs May's deal making it through Parliament, Cabinet ministers are openly floating other approaches. </p><p>Amber Rudd today risked directly contradicting the PM by insisting 'nothing should be off the table' if the government's plan is rejected by the Commons. </p><p>Theresa May (pictured today in Downing Street) will warn today that a second Brexit referendum would cause 'irreparable damage' to Britain, as she tries to defuse anger at the news that her own aides have floated the idea </p><p>Boris Johnson (pictured last week) has insisted anyone backing a fresh referendum is 'out of their minds' and it would create 'feelings of betrayal' among millions of voters</p><p>One group, including Philip Hammond, Greg Clark and Ms Rudd, are pushing for the Commons to be allowed to vote on a range of options, including holding a second referendum to a Norway-style relationship.</p><p>In the clearest public statement yet, Mr Clark told the BBC today that if Mrs May's deal falls 'Parliament should be invited to say what it would agree with'.</p><p>He cautioned against a second referendum, saying it would 'continue the uncertainty for many more months'.</p><p>Ms Rudd said this morning that Parliament should be allowed to express its will and 'nothing should be off the table'. </p><p>But harder line Brexiteers believe an 'options' vote would just be cover for delaying or cancelling Brexit.</p><p>They are urging a 'managed' no deal exit - which could involve paying the EU for a transition period and limited agreements to limits the worst effects of crashing out. </p><p>As the wrangling continues, Home Secretary Sajid Javid is understood to be among ministers who are pressing Mrs May to activate large scale no-deal planning - on the basis that the outcome must now by the central assumption for the government.</p><p>Mrs May is due to gather senior ministers in Downing Street for an informal discussion on the situation - before what could be a crucial full meeting tomorrow morning.</p><p>Despite hitting a brick wall of EU resistance to improving her Brexit deal at a summit last week, Mrs May is still hoping to get tweaks and wants to delay a crunch vote on the package until after Christmas. </p><p>Labour is holding off on staging a no-confidence vote in the government until after the deal is defeated, although many of its MPs are furious that Jeremy Corbyn has not already tried to strike.  </p><p>In the Commons this afternoon, Mrs May will all but rule out holding a second vote while she remains in charge.</p><p>Another referendum would 'likely leave us no further forward than the last... and further divide our country at the very moment we should be working to unite it', she will warn.</p><p>Mrs May launched a blistering attack yesterday on Tony Blair for backing a second referendum</p><p>She will add: 'Let us not break faith with the British people by trying to stage another referendum, another vote which would do irreparable damage to the integrity of our politics, because it would say to millions who trusted in democracy that our democracy does not deliver.'</p><p>Her intervention comes amid mounting anger over the revelation that chief-of-staff Gavin Barwell and deputy David Lidington had backed the idea of a second referendum.</p><p>MPs and ministers reacted furiously to reports yesterday that Mr Barwell had told colleagues a second poll was 'the only way forward' in the light of opposition to her Brexit deal. </p><p>In social media messages yesterday, Mr Barwell said he was not planning for a second referendum.</p><p>Mr Lidington also raised eyebrows after it emerged he held secret talks last week with Labour MPs in favour of another poll.</p><p>Despite the denials, Cabinet sources complained that the rumours had the 'ring of truth'. </p><p>Remainers also condemned the government for trying to 'run down the clock'. Former minister Sam Gyimah said: 'Downing St has stopped selling the PMs flawed deal. </p><p>'Instead we have displacement activity designed to distract from last weeks failed renegotiation. </p><p>'And a concerted attempt to discredit every plausible alternative as they run down the clock. This is not in the national interest.' </p><p>Mrs May's intervention comes amid mounting anger over the revelation that chief-of-staff Gavin Barwell and deputy David Lidington (pictured) had backed the idea of a second referendum</p><p>The news is embarrassing for Mrs May, who insists her Brexit deal is still alive and who has launched a blistering attack on Tony Blair for backing a second referendum.</p><p>In his Telegraph column today, Mr Johnson said if it was true that Downing Street aides had really been discussing a second referendum 'they must be out of their minds'.</p><p>'We had a referendum. It was a long and toxifying campaign. It divided the country. It caused an undue focus on the question of EU membership, normally far from the top of the list of the public's concerns,' he wrote.</p><p>'The public would be utterly infuriated - and rightly - if we now put them through years of that misery and expense again.</p><p>'They would know immediately that they were being asked to vote again simply because they had failed to give the 'right' answer last time. </p><p>'They would suspect, with good grounds, that it was all a gigantic plot, engineered by politicians, to overturn their verdict. </p><p>'A second referendum would provoke instant, deep and ineradicable feelings of betrayal.' </p><p>Former Cabinet minister Priti Patel said a second vote would be a 'betrayal', adding: 'Those behind this have been against Brexit from day one. This is simply an attempt to overturn the will of the people.</p><p>The Conservatives have opened up a four-point lead over Labour despite weeks of infighting over Brexit, a new poll shows.</p><p>A YouGov survey of more than 5,000 voters put the Conservatives on 40 per cent support, with Labour on 36 per cent, the Lib Dems on 10 per cent and UKIP at 4 per cent.</p><p>The research was conducted from December 12-14, in the immediate aftermath of last week's attempted coup, which saw Theresa May survive a vote of no confidence from her own MPs.</p><p>Conventional political wisdom dictates that public support for political parties slumps when they are divided. </p><p>But the poll, commissioned by the People's Vote campaign, suggested that Tory support rose by two points compared with a YouGov poll the previous week. Support for Labour fell by one per cent.</p><p>The findings will raise concerns among Labour MPs about Jeremy Corbyn's failure to achieve a breakthrough. </p><p>He is holding out against forcing a vote of no confidence in Mrs May's Government because of fears she would win.</p><p>'The Cabinet need to stop looking for excuses and deliver on the referendum mandate.'</p><p>Robert Halfon, another former minister, urged Mr Barwell and Mr Lidington to deny the reports publicly. </p><p>He added: 'It would be a complete betrayal of what Theresa May said about respecting the 2016 People's Referendum, and moreover a betrayal of democracy, of the 17million-plus who voted to leave.'</p><p>One Cabinet minister revealed he had sought and received a direct pledge from Mrs May yesterday that she would never sanction a second referendum.</p><p>Another said: 'The idea of a second referendum is the talk of fools. The PM is never going to sign up to another referendum, and it is disappointing that people close to her are considering the idea.' </p><p>Liam Fox said a second referendum would be undemocratic and divisive, adding: 'This will not heal the division in the country – it perpetuates the division in the country.'</p><p>Speaking on the BBC1's Andrew Marr Show yesterday, the International Trade Secretary said: 'Supposing the Remain side won it by 52 to 48, but it was on a lower turnout – entirely possible.</p><p>'Let me tell you that if there is another referendum, which I don't think there will be, people like me will be immediately demanding it's best of three. Where does that end up?' Mrs May savaged Mr Blair yesterday over his support for a 'people's vote'.</p><p>In a strongly-worded attack, the Prime Minister accused her predecessor of 'undermining Britain's national interest.</p><p>She said: 'For Tony Blair to go to Brussels and seek to undermine our negotiations by advocating for a second referendum is an insult to the office he once held and the people he once served.</p><p>'We cannot, as he would, abdicate responsibility for this decision. Parliament has a democratic duty to deliver what the British people voted for. I remain determined to see that happen.'</p><p>Mr Blair hit back last night, accusing the PM of being 'irresponsible' by trying to push her deal through Parliament.</p><p>He said it was 'perfectly clear neither the British people nor their Parliament will unite behind the Prime Minister's deal' and that was why she was forced to pull the vote last week.</p><p>'In these circumstances it is not irresponsible or insulting to put forward an alternative way to achieve resolution,' he added.</p><p>Mr Barwell tweeted yesterday that he was 'off to play football, followed by a few hours work (this will not include planning for a second referendum)'.</p><p>Later, he said he was 'happy to confirm I do not want a second referendum', adding: 'It would further divide this country when we should be trying to bring people back together.'</p><p>Mr Lidington is thought to have met pro-Remain Labour MPs last Thursday to gauge the support for a second poll. One MP at the meeting said: 'He was sounding us out rather than encouraging us. I didn't detect his view – it was more of a fact-finding mission.' </p><p>Holding a second Brexit referendum would enrage millions of Leave voters who were told their decision would be final.</p><p>But as well as being divisive, the practicalities of another poll are far from straightforward – whatever Tony Blair and the 'People's Vote' campaign claim.</p><p>A referendum would require a new law which would have to be proposed by the Government and agreed by Parliament. The rows over the questions would be endless.</p><p>Many Leave MPs would argue that voters have already answered the question 'Leave or Remain', and so the options on any second referendum ballot paper should be either Theresa May's deal or 'no deal'.</p><p>But Parliament, which has a Remain majority, would be expected to insist on an option to stay in the EU. </p><p>So there could be two questions – Leave or Remain followed by 'deal or no deal'. Another option would be to have a three-way choice.</p><p>Alternatively there could be two votes several days apart, the first on whether or not to stay in the EU, with a second held if Leave wins on how to carry out Brexit.</p><p>Or voters could be asked to pick their preferences in order of one two and three.</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Bus passenger launches astonishing racist attack on driver AND other commuters chase him away

    Bus passenger launches astonishing racist attack on driver AND other commuters chase him away

    calling him an 'immigrant c***' and screaming: 'Get back to your f***ing country'.</p><p>The passenger had exploded with rage after the driver asked him to show his Oyster card around a fortnight ago.</p><p>Chasing the victim from the top deck he then screams: 'I hope you get f***ing deported' and 'get back to your own f***ing country - this is our country'.</p><p>The driver was forced to flee and locked himself in his cab but his abuser then tried to smash his way in while also spitting at him.</p><p>He then decided to block the vehicle's path while pounding the windscreen and beating his chest before grabbing soft drinks and cans of beer from his shopping to spray on the bus.</p><p>After destroying the windscreen wipers, the out of control passenger was filmed wrenching open the bus driver's window and was able to beat his victim around the face. </p><p>This is the moment a racist bus passenger punches the driver through the window after a meltodown sparked when asked to show his Oyster card</p><p>The thug tries to smash his way into the cab before blocking its path and destroying its windscreen wipers</p><p>Three other passengers are infuriated by his behaviour and punch, kick and restrain him until he stops trying to attack the driver</p><p>A man on board then yells: 'Open the doors' and at least three passengers run off and start fighting him as cars and buses drive around them. </p><p>One man punches him in the head and pushes him against a passing car while another repeatedly kicks him in the rear. </p><p>A third man then restrains him and manages to stop his racist and violent tirade. </p><p>The four minute video ends with the thug collecting his belongings from the pavement and road while yelling 'f*** off' repeatedly as the driver shuts the doors and pulls away. </p><p>The video has been flagged to Scotland Yard - but it is not known if the man has been arrested. </p><p>The attack started with him yelling racist abuse at the driver from the top deck before pounding on the windscreen and attacking him</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018
  • Teenager haunted by her father’s death hanged herself at the same spot in the woods

    Teenager haunted by her father’s death hanged herself at the same spot in the woods

    d hanged at the same spot where he had taken his own life almost a decade earlier, an inquest heard.</p><p>Mia Bell, from Alfreton, Derbyshire, was found hanging in woodland near her home by a group of children.</p><p>The teenager had been an 'outgoing and happy child' until her father Steven took his own life in 2008, when she was just six-years-old.</p><p>Mia never got over the loss of her father and regularly visited the woods to be close to him.</p><p>Mia Bell, 15, from Alfreton, Derbyshire, was found hanging in woodland by a group of children. Her father Steven had taken his own life in the same spot in 2008</p><p>On the day of the tragedy Mia had been helping out in the garden and relatives had no reason to suspect anything when she told them she was going to a secluded spot before developers began building houses on it.</p><p>Chesterfield Coroner’s Court heard a group of children approached a passing dog walker and told him they had 'seen a demon in the woods'.</p><p>He went to investigate and immediately dialled 999 when he found Mia.</p><p>Paramedics arrived at the scene and began CPR and managed to regain a pulse.</p><p>The young girl was rushed to King’s Mill Hospital in Sutton-in-Ashfield, Nottingham, and then transferred to Nottingham’s Queen’s Medical Centre, but deteriorated quickly and died on August 31 last year.</p><p>The inquest, held on Friday, December 14, heard that Mia was a troubled young woman with a history of self-harm and hearing voices.</p><p>She also intermittently suffered from suicidal thoughts and hallucinations and spoke of a vision she sometimes had of a 'little girl with black hair' who 'told her to hurt herself'.</p><p>The court heard that Mia had been a happy child who loved going to sleepovers and parties, until her father Steven took his own life in 2008.</p><p>On her regular visits to the spot where he took his own life she would leave gifts of beer, flowers and notes.</p><p>When her mother Kelly Duffield began a new relationship, Mia had difficulties accepting her stepfather, forming a 'perceived rejection'.</p><p>Despite the family’s best efforts to make her feel loved and included she eventually moved out of the home.</p><p>In a formally arranged foster agreement, Mia moved in with her older cousin Carissa Bell, who was a 'nurturing' figure in her life.</p><p>On the day of the tragedy she had cheerfully been helping out in the garden.</p><p>Carissa said: 'I had no reason’ to suspect anything was wrong.</p><p>'Mia’s dad’s ashes were never buried, they were in storage. She didn’t have a grave she could go to, so instead she would visit the woods.</p><p>An inquest held at Chesterfield Coroner's Court on December 14 heard that Mia had been a happy child until her father Steven took his own life in 2008</p><p>'The day she left, she told me she was going out to the woods before ‘they were taken down’ as the area was being redeveloped for housing.</p><p>'I didn’t think I had any reason to worry, as it was such a regular thing.'</p><p>Tributes left to Mia on Facebook describe the teenager as a 'beautiful, caring and lovely’ girl' who 'never failed to make people laugh and smile'.</p><p>Giving evidence, mental health professionals who worked with Mia in the months leading up to her death said they were 'optimistic' that she was improving.</p><p>Chris Kirk, clinical pathway lead at Derbyshire Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAHMS), said: 'Mia was a very pleasant young lady who had been through some difficult times emotionally</p><p>'When it comes to the loss of her dad, I don’t know if a permanent resolution could ever have been found.</p><p>'But we were looking at ways of helping her cope and, to my mind, things seemed to be getting better.'</p><p>Sue Towers, young people’s counsellor at Speaksafe Relate, said: 'Mia seemed to be improving and was responding really well to counselling. I was so proud of her.'</p><p>Assistant coroner for Derbyshire Peter Nieto concluded that Mia died from hypoxic brain injury and hanging and had undertaken a ‘deliberate act’.</p><p>He added: 'Mia had written three notes which were found near to her which clearly read as suicide notes.</p><p>'She had chosen the place of her father’s death and his death clearly preoccupied her.'</p><p> The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. </p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p>Your comment will be posted to MailOnline as usual.</p><p>Do you want to automatically post your MailOnline comments to your Facebook Timeline?</p><p> We will automatically post your comment and a link to the news story to your Facebook timeline at the same time it is posted on MailOnline. To do this we will link your MailOnline account with your Facebook account. We’ll ask you to confirm this for your first post to Facebook.</p><p>Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday &amp; Metro Media Group</p>

    1 December 17, 2018

Comments